Archive for the ‘Hampden County’ Category

By Cliff McCarthy

After the clamor and hyperbole of the 2012 presidential election abates, we cannot help but be drawn to the past for comparison, or at least perspective, on our quadrennial media orgy. What a difference a century makes.

Campaigning was different in 1912, when the nation experienced one of its wildest and most bizarre presidential elections.  That was the year that former President Teddy Roosevelt broke with the Republican Party, which he claimed had been taken over by a conservative faction, and sought election under the new Progressive Party banner.  Proclaiming himself as healthy as a “bull moose,” TR vigorously stumped around the country, giving speeches from the caboose of a campaign train.  He called for stronger federal regulation of the economy and lambasted irresponsible corporate greed.  In Milwaukee on October 14, he was shot by a local saloonkeeper, the bullet lodging in his chest after penetrating his steel eyeglass case and a folded copy of his speech.  He gave the speech, then went to the hospital.

His rival, the rotund William H. Taft, disdained campaigning.  His strategy was to rely on the stature of his office and the Republican machine to deliver the necessary votes, while leading from the White House — the first “Rose Garden campaign.”  It may have been an omen when his running-mate, Vice-President James S. Sherman, died less than a week before the election.

The beneficiary of the Republicans’ turmoil was the Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson, whose “New Freedom” campaign highlighted individualism and a less powerful federal government.  At that time, only one Democrat had won the presidency in the previous half-century.

Adding to the mix, Eugene V. Debs ran a credible fourth party campaign on the Socialist Party ticket, winning nearly a million votes nationwide — 6% of the popular vote — having spent a total of $66,000 on his campaign.  And there was even a Prohibition Party candidate.

However wild the campaign was, the result was predictable.  Roosevelt effectively split the Republican vote, throwing the election to Woodrow Wilson in an electoral college landslide.  Roosevelt became the only third-party candidate to beat a mainstream candidate, Taft, in the electoral count.

Massachusetts went Democratic that year, supporting Wilson and Eugene Foss as Governor.  However, the staunchly Republican counties of the Pioneer Valley bucked the trend: Franklin and Hampshire went for Taft, while Wilson won Hampden by just thirty-five votes.

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Tiffany Window

Tiffany Window

By Maggie Humberston

On a hot, muggy afternoon in the Valley sometimes an exhibit comes along that just seems to re–write your soggy, wilted script. TheTiffany Trail at the Springfield Museums is doing that for me this summer. The D’Amour Museum of Fine Art is hosting Tiffany Lamps: Articles of Utility, Objects of Art. You enter a cool, low-lit gallery full of botanical shapes, unexpected textures and glorious colors – all executed in glass. One thing I like is that right away you’re oriented to the craft involved; two cases at the beginning of the show feature samples of the glass used in the pieces and the process of joining those pieces together into an artistic leaded glass whole. This gives the visitor an immediate appreciation of what’s involved in the creation of these decorative art lamps. As you walk through the show, the colors from the lampshades glow from their electric light, allowing you to see every intricate detail in their make-up. The show features a number of pieces of leaded glass, but also has blown glass, and my favorite, “favrile fabrique,” which renders glass into pleated folds that looks like cloth. Supplemental photos in large format depict the Tiffany Company workshops and sales rooms inNew York, newspaper advertisements, and some of the botanical inspirations for the work. The show runs through Sept. 9th.

 

Accompanying the show is the MFA’s exhibit of its own contemporary glass. It features works of older masters like Rene Lalique and Louis Comfort Tiffany himself, along with contemporary glass artists like Josh Simpson and Dale Chihuly.

 

On to the George Walter Vincent Smith Museum, built in 1895 and appropriately late Victorian in décor, to see the newly restored Tiffany windows which were commissioned by the Smiths themselves. Upstairs don’t miss Tiffany’s “The Light Bearer”,  given by the Bowles family, owners of the Springfield Republican, to the Church of the Unity, one of Henry Hobson Richardson’s churches, once holding court across State Street in Springfield. Sadly, it was demolished in the 1960s – to put up a parking lot.

 

Finally – and I did say it was a trail, right – you should go over to the new Wood Museum of Springfield History to see the Tiffany engraved guns on the second floor. There are lots of great photos of Springfield in the early 20th century on the walls to take you back to the heyday of Tiffany himself, and while you’re there you can see the kinds of industrial innovations and neat luxury cars that were the capstone of his era. 

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