Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ Category

Tiffany Window

Tiffany Window

By Maggie Humberston

On a hot, muggy afternoon in the Valley sometimes an exhibit comes along that just seems to re–write your soggy, wilted script. TheTiffany Trail at the Springfield Museums is doing that for me this summer. The D’Amour Museum of Fine Art is hosting Tiffany Lamps: Articles of Utility, Objects of Art. You enter a cool, low-lit gallery full of botanical shapes, unexpected textures and glorious colors – all executed in glass. One thing I like is that right away you’re oriented to the craft involved; two cases at the beginning of the show feature samples of the glass used in the pieces and the process of joining those pieces together into an artistic leaded glass whole. This gives the visitor an immediate appreciation of what’s involved in the creation of these decorative art lamps. As you walk through the show, the colors from the lampshades glow from their electric light, allowing you to see every intricate detail in their make-up. The show features a number of pieces of leaded glass, but also has blown glass, and my favorite, “favrile fabrique,” which renders glass into pleated folds that looks like cloth. Supplemental photos in large format depict the Tiffany Company workshops and sales rooms inNew York, newspaper advertisements, and some of the botanical inspirations for the work. The show runs through Sept. 9th.

 

Accompanying the show is the MFA’s exhibit of its own contemporary glass. It features works of older masters like Rene Lalique and Louis Comfort Tiffany himself, along with contemporary glass artists like Josh Simpson and Dale Chihuly.

 

On to the George Walter Vincent Smith Museum, built in 1895 and appropriately late Victorian in décor, to see the newly restored Tiffany windows which were commissioned by the Smiths themselves. Upstairs don’t miss Tiffany’s “The Light Bearer”,  given by the Bowles family, owners of the Springfield Republican, to the Church of the Unity, one of Henry Hobson Richardson’s churches, once holding court across State Street in Springfield. Sadly, it was demolished in the 1960s – to put up a parking lot.

 

Finally – and I did say it was a trail, right – you should go over to the new Wood Museum of Springfield History to see the Tiffany engraved guns on the second floor. There are lots of great photos of Springfield in the early 20th century on the walls to take you back to the heyday of Tiffany himself, and while you’re there you can see the kinds of industrial innovations and neat luxury cars that were the capstone of his era. 

Read Full Post »

China's Terra Cotta Warriors

China’s Terra Cotta Warriors

By Cliff McCarthy, Museum of Springfield History

Zheng was only thirteen when, in 246 BC, he became King of Qin, the westernmost state of China.  By his thirty-eighth year, he had achieved what no other warlord before him had done — he had conquered and unified all of the “warring states” of China, proclaiming himself Qin Shihuangdi, the Great August First Emperor of Qin.  Although successful in this life, the First Emperor greatly feared his own death.  If he could not conquer his own mortality, he could at least create for himself a comfortable afterlife filled with his treasures and riches.  And so, to guard his tomb, the First Emperor produced one of the world’s most amazing wonders — a military force of life-size, terra cotta warriors.

Numbering between 6 and 8 thousand, each figure is unique, averaging about 6 feet tall and weighing around 500 pounds.  There are infantryman, archers, charioteers, and cavalrymen, each with the sculpted face of an individual.  They wear their hair in different styles, sometimes with headdresses indicating social rank.

A comfortable afterlife requires more than just an army and so the First Emperor also brought with him entertainers — acrobats, strongmen, and musicians — to accompany him.  He  must have expected some level of red tape in the next world, because he brought “civil authorities” with him, as well.

All this was discovered by chance by some peasant farmers in 1974.  Since then, these treasures have been the subject of massive archeological digs, revealing new finds and opening a window into a culture more than 2000 thousand years old. Some of the figures have made limited tours of the world’s major cities and they are now on display in New York City at the Discovery Museum on 44th Street.  While not within the bounds of the Pioneer Valley, this exhibit is so extraordinary, and the figures so magnificent, that it merits special consideration for Valley residents looking for an amazing museum experience.

Actually, the Discovery Museum is easily accessible.  It is about a ten-block walk from Penn. Station, so the intrepid Valley adventurer can take Amtrak out of Springfield and return the same day, without the hassle of driving or parking in the city.  The exhibit runs until August 26th.  For more information, go to: www.discoverytsx.com

Read Full Post »