DECEMBER 2019

21 December — “Dashing Through the Snow: The Real History of Christmas in New England”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, One Armory Square, Springfield, 2 pm

Join speaker Dennis Picard for his program, “Dashing Through the Snow: The Real History of Christmas in New England” on Saturday, December 21 at 2 pm. Presentation will take place in the museum theater. Seating is limited, reservations are required. Admission is free.

We all have formed in our minds a picture of a perfect early New England Christmas. This image might include families decorating an evergreen tree, bedecking their houses with garlands, attending church services, giving gifts, and Santa Claus. It is amazing how many of us have these elements in our mental image of this festive time of the year.

The reality of Christmas in early New England may be disappointing to some and unbelieveable to many, but the historical actuality of that celebration – or lack of celebration – of Christmas is a very interesting tale and one that blends the heritage and spirit of many cultures and many lands.

Dennis Picard has been a museum professional in the living history field for forty years. He began his career at Old Sturbridge Village and was on staff at Hancock Shaker Village as a historic trade craftsman and site interpreter. Dennis retired in April 2017 after 27 years as director of the Storrowton Village Museum at the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield.

21 December — Opening: “Booze, Schmooze and News: Remembering Hatfield Taverns and Clubs”
Hatfield Historical Society, 39 Main St., Hatfield, 4:30 – 6 pm

Come join us for the new Hatfield Historical Society exhibit opening at the Hatfield Historical Museum this Luminarium SATURDAY, Dec. 21, 2019, from 4:30 to 6 pm.

In “Booze, Schmooze and News: Remembering Hatfield Taverns and Clubs,” we’ll bring back memories of some places you might have visited — the Hatfield Club and Barn, the Highway Club or the Dial Tone Lounge, where you could call the guy you fancied at the booth on the other side. Or perhaps you visited B&Bs Bar and Restaurant on Prospect Ct., the Last Chance Cafe on Circle Drive, or Buckwheat’s or Caspers on West St., and sampled some of Joe Mulherin’s pizza before he got his own place. Back when you could go out in Hatfield and find dancing and music several nights a week. Come get nostalgic and tell us what you remember.

We’ll also give you an idea what sorts of places graced Hatfield’s earlier days — and where people turned for alcohol during the periods of Temperance and Prohibition. Come see artifacts we rarely display — along with some loaned just for this exhibit.

Since we can’t offer alcoholic “flip,” we are offering eggnog generously provided by River Valley Coop and homemade cookies.

And, we are offering a photo opp — we’ll provide the props and the photographer to photograph you and/or a friend as an old drinker, then give it a sepia tint and post the portraits on our Facebook page. If you missed our last photo opp — “Who can look most like a machinist?”, don’t miss this one!

Our exhibit is sponsored by the following establishments:
The Hatfield Pub, 312 West St., N. Hatfield
The Hatfield American Legion Post 344, 1 Prospect St., Hatfield
Double Bs Bar & Grill, 4 Prospect Ct., Hatfield
Grill ‘N Chill, 127 Elm St., Hatfield

7-14 December — “Yuletide at Storrowton”
Storrowton Village Museum, West Springfield

Yuletide at Storrowton winter festival brings the community together to celebrate the season at Storrowton Village Museum in West Springfield, MA on December 7 and 8 from 11am to 4pm.

Decorated through the generosity of area garden clubs, high school horticulture students, florists and designers, the Village buildings will be bursting with innovative ideas and seasonal vignettes composed of natural materials. The event is also included on the annual West Springfield Boys & Girls Club Holiday Tour of Homes on Saturday, December 7.

The event is free to the public and will feature ice sculpting, entertainment, 19th century trades (blacksmithing, hearth cooking, typesetting, broom making, spinning) and livestock demonstrations, and a chance to visit with Santa. New in 2019 will be a Yankee Candle Retail Shop in the Greenwich Barn, and visitors can enjoy 25% off in the Gift Shop and Christmas Shop to stock up on holiday gifts, decorations and collectible ornaments. Stop by the family craft area to make-your-own holiday ornament and grab a hot beverage or treat from the Holiday Sweet Shoppe, where all proceeds benefit the educational programs at the museum.

Program for weekend events can be found at http://www.storrowtonvillage.com/p/events/storrowtonyuletide

14 December — West Mass Brass Ensemble Holiday Concert!
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Springfield, 2 pm

Bring your holiday cheer and join us for a festive afternoon concert on Saturday, December 14 at 2:00 pm performed by West Mass Brass. Sing along to your favorite holiday songs or just sit back and enjoy the magic of the Christmas season. Admission is free.

“Employees at the Springfield Armory enjoyed the Christmas season. They had office and shop parties, some held at the Armory, others at downtown hotels.  With thousands of employees, spread across a multitude of departments, employees mingled as they celebrated the holiday season. We are quite fortunate to continue this holiday musical tradition with West Mass Brass at this historic site,” remarked Park Ranger, Susan Ashman

West Mass Brass started in September 2014. Brass brass band enthusiasts, music majors, music teachers and students all came together to play music in the British brass band tradition. Band members come from all over Western Massachusetts and Southern Connecticut to share their love of music.

“The mission of the band is to perpetuate British style brass banding.  Its goals include providing challenging music to play in suitable settings, and sharing the unique sound of a quality brass band with the public.” Band leader Ken McCance commented.

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of the nation’s first armory, established in 1794. As a unit of the National Park Service, the Visitor Center and museum are currently open Wednesday – Sunday , 9 am-5 pm. The museum is closed on Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check the website at http://www.nps.gov/spar or http://www.facebook.com/sparnhs

11 December — “75 Years of Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary: A Natural Gem is Our Own Back Yard,”
Northampton Neighbors’ Speakers Series
Northampton Senior Center, 67 Conz St., Northampton, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

with Jonah Keane, Sanctuary Director, Mass Audubon’s Connecticut River Valley Sanctuaries. Before joining Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary in 2014, Jonah worked with the Student Conservation Association (SCA) as manager of the SCA Massachusetts AmeriCorps program and as the Northeast Regional Program Director for two years.  He has a MS in Forest Ecology, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and a BS in Environmental Studies. University of Vermont. He served in the Peace Corps in Bolivia for three years. He enjoys spending time in the woods year-round.

10 December — Annual Pelham Potluck Dinner
Pelham Historical Society
Pelham Community Hall, (across from the police station), Pelham, 5:30 pm

The Pelham Historical Society will hold a brief annual meeting at 5:30 to transact membership business before the annual potluck dinner.

Come to celebrate the holiday season with your friends and neighbors, with a social hour and sit-down potluck dinner at our Community Hall. After dinner, feel free to sing along with oldies performed by David Boyden on his guitar. For reservations and to provide information on your contribution (appetizer, main dish, vegetable, salad, bread or dessert), please contact: Ginia Servos, 413-687-0258 or giniaservos@gmail.com.

8 December — “Nonotuck Life Along the Kwinitekw: Revisiting Indigenous Histories in Northampton”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

with Dr. Margaret Bruchac.  Traces of Indigenous history can be difficult to see beneath the bustle of present-day cities situated along the Kwinitekw (Connecticut River). Yet, many generations of Native people lived here, sustained by local flora and fauna and supported by trade and diplomacy with their Native neighbors. In this talk, Bruchac critically analyzes colonial documents, archaeological records, and the writings of town historians, who re-imagined the colonial era in ways that erased Indigenous perspectives. This talk will also feature a case study from the 1800s of the supposed “last of the Indians here,” Sally Maminash (1765-1853). Sponsored by Herrell’s Ice Cream.

Registration is recommended. Seating is limited to 55.
$5 for members and donors | $10 all others.

8 December — PVHN Holiday Gathering
Munich Haus, Chicopee, 6 pm

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

PVHN’s Holiday Gathering will be held on Sunday, December 8 at 6 pm at the Munich Haus, 13 Center St,, in Chicopee and you are invited.  Feel free to bring your friends and significant others to this joyous event.  You will have an opportunity to order dinner from the Munich Haus’ menu, so come hungry. Catch up with old friends and make some new ones. Mark your calendar, now, so you don’t forget.

The idea of a costume party did not take off, but if you would like to come in costume to this Gathering you can, if you dare!  See you there!

7 December — “A Century of Restaurants in Northampton”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

by Jan Whitaker.  Restaurant historian Jan Whitaker will present an illustrated history of Northampton’s restaurants of the 20th century. She will discuss the town’s prominent and influential restaurants of the past, along with its ordinary and forgotten places. Whitaker will look at the highs and lows of the city’s restaurant history, from the Great Depression to the “renaissance” of the 70s and 80s. Come look at menus in the museum collection from different eras.

Registration is recommended. Seating is limited to 55. Sponsored by Sylvester’s & Roberto’s Restaurants.

$5 for members and donors | $10 all others.

5 December — “Victorian Christmas Traditions”
Southwick Historical Society
Southwick Town Hall, Southwick, 6:30 pm

Visit with Victoria Yule in 1895! Enjoy carols, dramatic readings from Dickens, and the history of our many beloved Christmas traditions, includes, trees, cards, decorations, and food. This theatrical performance is truly an audience favorite.

1 December — Holiday Open House & Sing-Along
Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd. Monson, 1 to 3:30 pm.

The public is invited to tour the Keep Homestead Museum to enjoy special button exhibits as well as a Holiday Sing-a-Long led by Joe Wholley, flutist, and Gay Paluch, pianist. Visitors will have the opportunity to join voices to celebrate the Holiday season and to learn about the history of carols and seasonal songs as they discover the beauty of buttons hailing from around the world.

An exhibit entitled “Christmas Buttons” features several special collections of Myra Keep’s heirloom buttons. Superimposed on a music staff are black glass buttons, each one representing a note in the carol, “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” Among the Bethlehem Mother of Pearl hand carved shell buttons are an angel with spread wings, Madonna and child, and a delicate carving of Mary and Joseph en route to Bethlehem. Buttons in all shades of red and green and symbols of Christmas, including candles, holly, poinsettia, and wreaths, will delight those who explore the historic collection at the museum.

On special display are buttons from the Sanderson collection. A contemporary of Myra’s, Alice Sanderson collected thousands of buttons which were caught in a fire. Many of Alice’s treasures were salvaged and now rotate in a special display at the museum. Her “Button Calendar” includes several buttons for each month with commentary in poetic form. For example, in January Alice writes “Goodness Sakes—Black Snowflakes” and concludes in December with “Good Gift—All Souls Lift.” Her collection includes buttons created from a variety of materials—slag glass, Czech glass, petit pointe, silver, wood inlay, and more. A button card entitled “Goofies” features colorful plastic buttons in all shapes including shoes, a bunch of asparagus, and all sorts of dogs.

This festive afternoon at the Keep Homestead Museum is free of charge. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 413-267-4137, email khm@keephomesteadmuseum.org or check the web at http://www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

NOVEMBER 2019

24 November — “Crosscut Saws, Bucking Logs & the Skills of a Climbing Arborist”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 1 pm

postponed

During the week of November 18th, Historic Northampton will take down two dying sugar maples. This is a loss for us and although we will repurpose the wood and plant new trees next spring, we will use this opportunity to highlight some of the tools and skills needed to cut trees in the ol’ days and now.

1:00 pm     Crosscut Saws with Stephen Holt and Mark Gould

Stephen Holt and Mark Gould, local woodsmen from Westhampton, will provide a history of crosscut saws, show different saw styles, demonstrate how to use them and give attendees a chance to try using a crosscut saw to buck a white pine log. The two have competed as a team in Woodsmen competitions throughout New England for more than a decade. In addition to the crosscut saw demonstration, Steve will use his portable Alaskan sawmill to cut the sugar maple trunks into slabs, which Historic Northampton will later use to create benches and tables.

2:15 pm     Skills of a Climbing Arborist with Rob English

Climbing arborist and Ward 3 resident Rob English will demonstrate the ropes, gear and knots he uses to safely climb trees-from simple ascents to hitchclimbers to throwlines–to access the canopy. He’ll also have a variety of chainsaws on hand and will discuss their different uses–e.g. top-handled saws for trimming limbs and rear-handled saws for more serious main trunks. Rob has worked as a climbing arborist for 16 years and will climb the impressive pin oak in the center of Historic Northampton’s grounds.

Did you know that people living in Northampton in the 18th and early 19th century needed about 35-40 cords of wood a year to cook and heat their homes?

23 November — “Silver Bell Bazaar”
Buckland Historical Society
at the Mary Lyon Church and in the Buckland Public Hall, 15 & 17 Upper St., Buckland Center, 9 am — 2 pm

Silver Bell Bazaar, at the Mary Lyon Church and in the Buckland Public Hall, 15 & 17 Upper St., Buckland Center on Saturday Nov 23rd 9 am to 2 pm. Silent Auction, Baked goods, Arts & Crafts, Book Sale, Tag Sale items, framed photos and paintings, greeting cards, Holiday items and gifts, many Raffles. Beverages and snacks. Buffet Lunch 11 am to 2 pm

Adults $12, children 6 to 12 $6, under age 6 free. More info: 413-625-9440 or
email: info@marylyonchurch.org

22 November — “The Lincoln-Sunset Historic District”
History Bites Lunchtime Lecture Series
Woodbury Rm., Jones Library, Amity St., Amherst, 12:15 pm

Maurianne Adams will present a discussion on the historic Lincoln-Sunset district of Amherst, including the history of farm houses lived in by members of the 19th century Black community and Irish immigrants, as well as houses that were home to college faculty members, businessmen, and other professionals and their families. Amherst College faculty member Robert Frost purchased a home in this neighborhood in 1931. It was named a Historic District by the town in 2017.

Please note:  this talk will be in the Woodbury Room at the Jones Library.

Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at amhersthistory.org.

21 November — “The 1960 ANPO Protest and Freedom of Expression in Postwar Japan”
UMass History Department, Dept. of Languages and Literatures, & the Five College Japan Lecture Series
Rm. 174, Campus Center, UMass, Amherst, 4:30 pm

Public lecture by Nick Kapur.

This talk examines the impact of the massive 1960 protests in Japan against the US-Japan security treaty on Japanese society. Although the protests ultimately failed to prevent passage of a revised version of the treaty, they did grow to become the largest popular protests in Japanese history and brought about the downfall of Japan’s conservative government. Although the protests had some positive outcomes, in this talk I will focus on the ways (both obvious and more subtle) that freedom of expression came to be increasingly constrained in relation to the Japanese media, Supreme Court cases on freedom of assembly, policing tactics and strategy, and the reemergence of right-wing ultranationalism and rightist violence.

This talk is especially pertinent as modern democratic governments continue to struggle with how to respond to protests and strikes without violating freedoms of the press, expression, and assembly—often without success.

Nick Kapur received his Ph.D. in Japanese history from Harvard University and is presently Assistant Professor of History at Rutgers University’s Camden campus, where he teaches Japanese and East Asian history. His research interests focus on modern Japan and East Asia in transnational and comparative perspective. His book Japan at the Crossroads details transformations in Japanese politics, culture and society, as well as US-Japan relations and the Cold War international system, that unfolded in the aftermath of the massive 1960 protests against the US-Japan Security Treaty. In addition, he has recently written articles on Chinese and Japanese environmental policy since 1970, US-Japan relations during the John F. Kennedy administration, and the 1968 centennial celebrations of Japan’s Meiji Restoration.

30 May thru early November — “Art in the Everyday: A Photographer’s Perspective at Springfield Armory”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, One Armory Way, Springfield

A new exhibit showcasing historic and rarely seen photographs from the archives at Springfield Armory National Historic Site will be on view through the fall of 2019 in the museum’s temporary exhibit gallery. “Art in the Everyday: A Photographer’s Perspective at Springfield Armory” opens to the public with a special reception on Thursday, May 30, from 6 to 8 pm. The event will include light refreshments and a cash bar generously provided by the Friends of Springfield Armory National Historic Site. Admission is free.

The museum collection at Springfield Armory NHS holds thousands of photographs that feature the people, experiments, and factory work at Springfield Armory from the late 1800s through the 1960s. The staff photographers taking those pictures were well versed in their craft and its limitations. Their expert use of manually adjusted cameras and lenses, glass-plate and film negatives contrasts to today when just about everyone has a camera in their pocket.

“The photographers at Springfield Armory were artists,” says Alex MacKenzie, Curator. “They may have been documenting an everyday occurrence, but they absolutely had an eye for composition as they recorded the Armory and its community on film.” The exhibit, which is part of the “Arts at the Armory” slate of programming throughout the summer of 2019, is designed to evoke an art gallery exhibition, prompting visitors to view the Armory in a different way as they look at the framed prints like windows into the past.

The photos range in dates from 1910 through 1965, and show various facets of life at Springfield Armory as seen from the photographer’s perspective. Contrasting images evoke all five senses with slamming forges, peaceful settings on the grounds, hot flying sparks, and oily machines in stunning visual portraits. The exhibit will run through early November.

The Springfield Armory National Historic Site is the location of the nation’s first armory (1794-1968), and was established by George Washington. The site includes historic grounds, buildings, and the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. There is ample parking and the building is wheelchair accessible. The Museum is open 9 am to 5 pm, Wednesday to Sunday, November 1 to Memorial Day, and then seven days a week from Memorial Day to October 31. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check http://www.nps.gov/spar.

19 November — “A Drink When We Want It and a Cup for a Thirsty Traveler”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6 – 7 pm

Cider History with Dennis Picard

On Tuesday, November 19 from 6 – 7 p.m., Wistariahurst will host a lecture entitled Cider History with Dennis Picard: A Drink When We Want It and a Cup for a Thirsty Traveler as part of the ongoing Wistariahurst Historical Lecture Series People, Places, Food, & Sport.

Come quaff your thirst for Cider History with historian Dennis Picard who will introduce you to traditional New England cider making by sharing images, stories and history of cider making techniques that took place over the centuries.

Advance registration is strongly encouraged. Please visit http://www.Wistariahurst.org or call 413-322-5660 to RSVP. Donations will be accepted at the door.

17 November — “Honoring the Sugar Maples”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton

Age and disease have taken their toll on two of Historic Northampton’s large sugar maples and we have made the difficult decision to take them down before they fall and cause damage to either the Shepherd Barn (1806) or Parsons House (1719). But cutting down a tree–especially these impressive specimens–is not something we take lightly. To honor these trees and trees everywhere, we’ve arranged a series of programs on Sunday, November 17, 2019 that focus on the trees around us.

9:30 – 11:00 am     Special Trees in Downtown Northampton — Rich Parasiliti, Tree Warden for the City of Northampton.

On this walking tour, Tree Warden Rich Parasiliti will highlight some of his all-time favorite trees in downtown. He will describe their life histories and significance and the multiple values of shade trees and urban forests. Sponsored by National Grid.

Registration required. Limited to 20.
$8 members and donors. $12 all others.

4:30 pm     Trees and Forests of Northampton: The Many Ways They Serve Us — A Presentation by Tree Expert Bob Leverett

To honor Northampton’s trees and the multiple benefits they bring to our lives, Historic Northampton is pleased to welcome Bob Leverett. Bob will present an illustrated talk that highlights Northampton’s wealth of big championship quality trees as well as some of our special forests. Trees enhance our health, clean our air and water, calm and cool our streets and inspire us with their beauty. They are also a major factor in removing carbon from the air, helping to slow climate change. Sponsored by King & Cushman Insurance

Registration required. Limited to 55.
$5 members and donors; $10 all others.

6:30 pm    Honoring the Sugar Maples

All are welcome to gather at the sugar maple near the Historic Parsons House and consider this tree’s history. We will read some tree-related poetry and celebrate its life. Sponsored by Sugar Maple Trailside Inn.

16 November — “Full Snow Moon Gathering: A Talk on Traditional Native Finger Weaving”
Great Falls Discovery Center, Turners Falls, 1 – 3 pm

with Mashpee Wampanoag Elder Marlene Lopez, Rabbit Clan Mother

For hundreds of years, the Mashpee Wampanoag people have been finger weaving. Marlene Lopez has been finger-weaving and keeping this art alive by teaching others the knowledge that she has learned for 30 years. The designs are those of the Eastern Woodland and Plains people of Turtle Island during the 18th century. The style of weaving is called warpface. The designs are variations of the diagonal, Chevron, Arrowhead, diamond, flame and lightning. The items woven with these designs are ceremonial sashes, belts, garters, armbands, headbands, and hair-ties. Co-sponsored by DCR and Nolumbeka Project. Free admission. All welcome.

16 November — “Making a Model of 1847 Main Street”
Historic Northampton in partnership with the Amherst Railway Society
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

A Talk and Demonstration by John Sacerdote

John Sacerdote of the Amherst Railway Society will demonstrate how he constructed the twelve-foot long model of Northampton’s Main Street as it appeared in 1847. The model is the centerpiece of the exhibit Making it on Main Street.

John will first describe the process he used to make some of the 50 buildings. Then he will demonstrate making a building and show the specialty tools and supplies needed.

Registration required. Limited to 55.
$5 members & donors; $10 all others.

Sponsored by Mssrs. Czelusniak et Dugal, Inc.

16 November — “The Gamble of 1862: The Maryland Campaign”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, 1 Armory Square, Springfield, 2 pm

Join author and historian Matthew Borders for his presentation, The Gamble of 1862: The Maryland Campaign on Saturday, November 16 at 2 pm. Presentation will take place in the museum theater.

The Maryland Campaign, also known as the first Confederate invasion of the North, took place September 4-20, 1862. Following a sweeping turn of fortune, Confederate forces had gone in a 6 month period, in 1862, from being pushed back to the very edges of the capital in Richmond, Virginia to crossing the Potomac River and entering Union territory.

The resulting campaign of hard marches, lost orders, and terrible combat lasted just seventeen days. In the end, the Confederates had been driven back to Virginia and President Abraham Lincoln had the victory he needed to begin to change the entire focus of the war. From the fall of 1862 on, the American Civil War would be a war not only to preserve the Union, but a war to make men free.

Matthew Borders is a historian, author and a Park Ranger at Monocacy National Battlefield in Frederick, Maryland. He is also a guide at Antietam National Battlefield and Harpers Ferry National Historic Site. He volunteers regularly as a living history volunteer portraying Federal infantry and along with fellow Antietam Battlefield Guide, Joe Stahl, recently published his first book, Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam.

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of our Nation’s first armory, established in 1794. Managed with the Commonwealth of MA, Springfield Technical Community College and the National Park Service, it is the home of the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. The site is open Wednesday – Sunday, 9 AM- 5 PM. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check http://www.nps.gov/spar.

14 November — “The Ice Famine of 1919”
Westhampton Historical Society
at the Westhampton Public Library, 1 North Rd., Westhampton, 6:30 pm

One hundred years ago, weather conditions ruined the winter’s annual ice harvest. How could food be preserved in the heat of the summer? Man-made ice was the response to Mother Nature’s fickle ways.

Dennis Picard‘s presentation will include will include many interesting images of the progression of ice harvesting, the innovation of man-made ice, and how to store it, and an exhibit of ice harvesting tools.

13 November — “Sojourner Truth in 19th Century Florence” & “Over or Under?: Politicians, Railroads, Citizens, and Lobbyists Clash in 1890s Northampton”
Northampton Neighbors and Northampton Senior Center
at the Northampton Senior Center, 67 Conz St., Northampton, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

Talks in Brief:

Sojourner Truth, born a slave in New York state, lived in Florence for 13 years. During her time here she developed her public voice, fighting against slavery and inequality, and for women’s rights. The talk will be an overview of her life and her connections to the abolitionists in a Utopian community founded in Florence. Sojourner Truth is now a nationally recognized figure in the history of equal rights, with statues in Florence, Battle Creek, MI, the capitol rotunda in Washington D.C., and soon, Central Park.

Over or Under? In this forgotten chapter of Northampton history, the city’s dangerous grade crossings were at issue: Northampton wanted the railroad tracks to be elevated; the railroads wanted the highways raised. Pitted against the railroads’ aggressive team of political insiders and lawyers, the city and its enraged citizens fought, and won. The talk will focus the contentious campaign on the Main and North street crossings.

Speaker Bios:

Wendy Sinton, M.A., M.S.W., has developed a passion for local history since relocating to Western Mass. 20 years ago. She quickly got involved in the Sojourner Truth committee and its commitment to honoring Sojourner’s life, values and commitment to equality.  She is involved in developing curriculum materials and a walking tour about this local historical figure and nationally important woman with Northampton 5th grade teachers.

Diane E. Liebert has a Master’s Degree in History and a Ph.D. in Educational Research. She has been involved in the Sojourner Truth Memorial Committee since the statue was unveiled in 2002. She has a 25-year history doing educational research and evaluation, and has been the Evaluator of grants to the Sojourner Truth Committee over the past 7 years.

Lu Stone is author of A House. A Street. A City. The Story of 17 Summer, part of a chapbook series published by the city of Northampton for its 350th anniversary, and the forthcoming, North to Market. Two Streets. Two Centuries. A Sheaf of Northampton Stories, and editor of Back Row, Back Ward. The Redevelopment of Northampton State Hospital. She has led tours of the Market Street neighborhood for Historic Northampton. During her 40-year career in advertising, marketing and public relations, she worked with scores of public and private colleges and universities, and independent schools, to advance their admissions and development goals.

12 November — “Pelham Fire Department: Past & Present”
Pelham Historical Society
at Ramsdell Rm., Pelham Public Library, 7 pm

* postponed, inclement weather *

At 7PM there will be the Annual Meeting of the Pelham Historical Society, followed by a presentation at 7:30, and then we will have a tour of the Pelham Fire Department.

Pelham Fire Department: Past & Present

Present and past members of the Pelham Fire Department and several others will share factual and anecdotal information on Pelham’s fires and Fire Department history and evolution.  This panel discussion, led by Chief Raymond Murphy, Jr., will be followed by a brief tour of the Fire Department facility.  You are invited to bring your own stories about Pelham’s fire history.  For more information contact: David Boyden, 860-653-4140.

10 November — “True Stories of Veterans’ Service in Vietnam, Iraq & the Phillipines”
Palmer Historical & Cultural Center, 2072 Main St., Three Rivers, 7 pm

Rev. Dr. Beverly Prestwood-Taylor, Director of the Brookfield Institute, will give a presentation for the Palmer Historical & Cultural Center on the true stories of veterans’ service in Vietnam, Iraq, and the Phillipines during WWII. John Sacco, a Silver Star recipient, will tell about his experience of service. Attendees will also learn how to record and submit the stories of veterans in their family or community.

The presentation will culminate with a pinning ceremony for Vietnam and Vietnam-era veterans, welcoming them home. If you or someone you know is interested in being pinned, please contact us at palmerhcc@gmail.com.

Free admission (Freewill donations kindly accepted)

9 November — “Marching on Main Street: Lesbian/Gay Liberation in 1982 to LGBTQ Rights Today”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

A Public Talk by J.M. Sorrell, Social Justice Activist and Writer

J.M. Sorrell will tell the nearly forty-year-long story of Northampton Pride. In 1982, a small group of local and student activists organized the first annual Northampton Lesbian and Gay Liberation March. Walkers gathered at the Bridge Street School lawn and marched down Main Street to Pulaski Park where a rally was held. Nearly forty years later, Main Street is still the route–but now in reverse to the Three County Fairgrounds to accommodate the tens of thousands of participants.

Registration required. Limited to 55.
$5 members & donors; $10 all others.

Sponsored by River Valley Market

8 November — “Native American/King Philip’s War”
History Bites Lunchtime Lecture Series
at the Woodbury Room, Jones Library, 12:15 pm

Dr. Christine DeLucia, associate professor of history at Mount Holyoke College, will discuss her new book, Memory Lands, in which she offers a major reconsideration of the violent 17th-century conflict in northeastern America known as King Philip’s War. She provides an alternative to Pilgrim-centric narratives that have conventionally dominated the histories of colonial New England. DeLucia grounds her study of one of the most devastating conflicts between Native Americans and European settlers in early America in five specific places that were directly affected by the crisis, spanning the Northeast as well as the Atlantic world. She examines the war’s effects on the everyday lives and collective mentalities of the region’s diverse Native and Euro-American communities over the course of several centuries, focusing on persistent struggles over land and water, sovereignty, resistance, cultural memory, and intercultural interactions.

Please note:  this talk will be in the Woodbury Room at the Jones Library. Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at amhersthistory.org.

7 November — “Devil’s Den to Lickingwater: How a Small, Little-Known River Once Shaped the Landscape and History of The Connecticut River Valley”
Museums a la Carte Lecture Series
Davis Auditorium, Springfield Museums, 12:15 pm

The Springfield Museums presents a lecture by Professor John Sinton, November 7, from 12:15 to 1 pm in the Davis Auditorium. Devil’s Den to Lickingwater: How a Small, Little-Known River Once Shaped the Landscape and History of The Connecticut River Valley is part of the popular lunchtime lecture series Museums á la Carte.

John Sinton, who is co-moderator of the Mill River Greenway Initiative and Adjunct Professor of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, University of Massachusetts Amherst, will present information gathered for his new book Devil’s Den to Lickingwater: The Mill River through Landscape and History.

The Mill River, which runs from Williamsburg through Northampton, MA, has shaped this part of the Connecticut River Valley and reflects the history of New England. Sinton will explore the historical significance of the Mill River. He will discuss Native American lore and the dramatic changes in the Valley as English colonists appropriated it in the 17th century. He will also consider the onset of great environmental transformations and the industrialization of the United States as witnessed through the story of this river. The Mill River played a major role in the history of Northampton but it was diverted out of town in 1940. Sinton will pose the question: Does this small river still matter?

John Sinton is a retired environmental studies professor and a founding member of the Mill River Greenway Initiative. His new book Devil’s Den to Lickingwater: The Mill River Through Landscape & History tells the multifaceted tale of the Mill River in Western Massachusetts, from its emergence after the glaciers 20,000 years ago to the present. Little escapes Sinton’s voracious historical appetite—the creation of the landscape, the disappearance and reappearance of native fish and animals, the Mill River as a Native American crossroads, the contrast between English and Native ways of managing the land, the transformations wrought by war, floods and industrial disasters, the extraordinary role of the Mill River in the Industrial Revolution, and exceptional personalities from Sachem Umpanchala to Calvin Coolidge: all this is told through the arc of the Mill River’s history—beloved, abused, diverted, and ultimately reclaimed as an integral part of the landscape.

6 November — “An Evening of Abenaki Stories, Music & Language”
Great Falls Discovery Center, Turners Falls, 6:30 – 8 pm

with Jesse Bruchac

Storyteller, author, musician, and Abenaki language teacher, Jesse Bruchac weaves the telling of traditional stories with flute music and playful language games to share a glimpse of Northeastern Native American culture with audiences of all ages.

According to Jesse, “Native languages offer speakers a window into an indigenous worldview.” He is one of the last fluent speakers of Western Abenaki and works vigorously to revitalize the language. He is an accomplished musician, producing several albums of Abenaki music. These include collections of
traditional songs of drum and rattle and Native American flute music. Sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project, DCR, and Friends of the Great Falls Discovery Center.

6 November — “Cash or Credit? A Look at Payments for Goods and Services on Main Street from the 18th Century to the Present”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 11 am – noon

Join collections manager Kelsy Sinelnikov for a look at objects in the collection related to banking and commerce.

Discover what you could buy in exchange for a cord of wood by looking at local account books. Examine 18th and 19th century paper money issued by local banks before a national currency took its place. Finally, discuss the rise of credit cards through a look at their predecessor, the charge plate.

Sponsored by Florence Bank and Greenfield Savings Bank

25 October thru 6 November — “25 Years of CiderDays”
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A., Turners Falls

Over twenty-five years, CiderDays has evolved to a three day, county-wide festival celebrating the apple in all of its forms and providing sessions on every aspect of apple usage. The Great Falls Discovery Center hosts an exhibition of historic cider presses and images that honor the orchards, producers and enthusiasts who have advanced the art of cidermaking. Sponsored by the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce. November 1-3, 2019. For a full schedule visit: ciderdays.org.

3 November — Button Appraisal Day
Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd., Monson, 1 – 3:30 pm

with Gretchen and George Gauthier

Do you have your grandmother’s button box? Would you like to learn some of the stories of these? Or do you have a favorite button that you would like to know about? Does it have some monetary value? The Gauthiers are long time button collectors. George began collecting buttons because his late wife, Joy, had inherited a large jar of buttons and began sorting them. The Gauthier’s have been judging buttons at state, regional and local competitions for many years.  They have helped clean and recard collections at the Keep Museum.

While people are waiting to have their buttons appraised, they will be free to roam the museum that has one of the largest button collections in the US. In addition, there is the furniture, collections, photos of the Keep Family that lived in the house for over 150 years.

All are welcome, whether or not they have buttons to be appraised. There is no admission charge or charge for the appraisal, although donations are accepted. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call 413-267-4137,

email: khm@keephomesteadmuseum.org

or check the web at: http://www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

2 November — 30th Anniversary Event
Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts
at the Munich Haus, 13 Center St, Chicopee, 9:30 am – 3 pm

Join the PGSMA for its 30th Anniversary Lunch and Learn. This Saturday event will feature two wonderful speakers (Coleen Fitzpatrick and Daniel Bucko), a Polish luncheon catered by Munich Haus, a raffle, plenty of opportunities for questions and answers and meeting your fellow attendees.

Due to limited seating and luncheon service, pre-registration for this event is required. Cost is $30 for PGSMA members and $40 for non-members. Register at http://pgsma.org/30th-anniversary-event.html

DNA Results: What Can I Do With Them? by Colleen Fitzpatrick, PhD
In her talk, Colleen will review how you can use your DNA results to advance your genealogical research. Some of the tools she will explore with us include:
• Gedmatch Genesis – The Basics
• The Shared cM Project
• DNA Painter

Polish Vital Records and How Best to Find Them by Daniel Bućko, Genealogist based in Poland
In his presentation delivered via Skype, Daniel will provide a comprehensive overview of how to locate records in Poland that you need to grow your family tree. Topics covered will include:
• Overview of the main Polish State Archives for each region of Poland
• Overview of the Polish Diocesan Archives for each region of Poland
• On-line resources for each region of Poland
• Limitations or what is not available to a researcher at this time in Poland
• Parish Archives and how to get the records
• Polish Civil Registers and how to get the records

Cost is $30 for PGSMA members and $40 for non-members

2 November — “From Apple Trees to Cider, Please: An Apple Story Walk”
Great Falls Discovery Center, Turners Falls, 1 – 3 pm

In honor of Franklin County Cider Days and its 25th anniversary, November 1-3, we’re taking a walk. As you stroll along the Discovery Center’s grounds, you’ll enjoy the picture book From Apple Trees to Cider, Please, by Felicia Sanzari Chernesky. For children ages 4-8 and their friends, siblings, and families.

Also, stop by the center for activities and crafts all about apples. For more information on the Franklin County Cider Days visit: http://www.ciderdays.org. This program is rain or shine. In case of inclement weather, the story walk will be indoors inside the center.

2 November — “Images of the American Soldier in WWI, WWII & Vietnam”
Friends of the Springfield Armory National Historic Site
Springfield Armory Museum, One Armory Square, Springfield, 2 p.m.

The Springfield Armory Museum will present a military photography history program focused on American soldiers from World War I to Vietnam.  The presenter will be Dr. Erik B. Villard, a noted military historian who specializes in the Vietnam War.  Dr. Villard presentation will feature a selection of Army photographs from the three wars that were collected from the National Archives and then digitally restored to make them clear and vivid for the modern audience. He will cover the National Archives still image collection, showing the highlights and the omissions in the photographic history of the U.S. Army during this period.  The organization and content of the National Archives Still Image collection will also be discussed.  He will describe how American soldiers were captured on film from 1917 to 1972.  Dr. Villard has authored number books including the Combat Operations: Staying the Course, October 1967 to September 1969, published by the U.S. Army Center of Military History.  He has also authored numerous articles.

This program is aimed at those with an interest in military history, photography, and technology related to digitally restored photographs.

The program is sponsored by the Friends of the Springfield Armory National Historic Site and is free. It will be held in the Springfield Armory Museum Dr. Villard talk will feature a selection of Army photographs from the three wars that were collected from the National Archives and then digitally restored to make them clear and vivid for the modern audience.

OCTOBER 2019

30 October — “A Springfield Preservation Story: The Willys-Overland Building”
Western Massachusetts Historical Commission Coalition
at Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, 60 Congress St., Springfield, 10 – noon

More details to come as we finalize speakers and the agenda.  Hope you can make it!  As always, if you have questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Stacia Caplanson
Preservation Circuit Rider for Central and Western MA
Preservation Massachusetts
617-999-3256
scaplanson@preservationmass.org

Preservation Massachusetts
www.preservationmass.org
34 Main Street Extension, Suite 401
Plymouth, MA 02360

30 October — “Railroad Heritage of Holyoke”
Holyoke Public Library, 250 Chestnut St., Holyoke, 6 p.m.

with Dick Joyce

Join us as Holyoke native and railway enthusiast Dick Joyce shares the 2015 video of his “Tour of Railroad Heritage of Holyoke.”  He will then lead an informal conversation about the twentieth-century rail lines that were an integral part of Holyoke’s economy until the 1960s.  An exhibit of related materials from the Holyoke History Room, featuring the Holyoke & Westfield and the Connecticut River Railroads, will be on view. In the Community Room.  Free and open to the public.

26 October — Western New England Chapter Meeting
Association for Gravestone Studies
at the Westfield Athenaeum, Westfield

Morning session, 10 AM to noon, followed by a light lunch, then (weather permitting) an informal tour of one or more local cemeteries.

Al and Betsy McKee will present the results of a recent LIDAR and Ground Penetrating Radar survey of the old burying ground in Longmeadow, and an up-date of their research on local carvers.

CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SPEAKERS — If you would like to do a presentation (20-30 mins.) during the morning session, contact Bob Drinkwater: soulestones@gmail.com  or (413) 549-0581.

More details to follow . . . if you plan to attend, please R. S. V. P.  to Andrea:  anduruna@hotmail.com

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  Free will donations are requested to help cover the costs of coffee, snacks and lunch.

26 October — “Reading the Forested Landscape in Pelham”
Pelham Historical Society
at the Pelham Library Ramsdell Room, Pelham, noon – 4 pm

Presentation at the Pelham Library Ramsdell Room followed by Interpretive Walk
Rain Date: Sunday, October 27, 12 to 4 p.m.

Join the renowned terrestrial ecologist and author Tom Wessels for a presentation on learning to read our forest landscape, followed by an interpretive walk at 1:30 p.m.  Using tree stump decay patterns, the construction of stone walls, and much more, Tom will show us how to unravel the agricultural, logging, and wind histories in our forests.  Tom’s books will be available for sale.

Come along for the presentation, walk, or both!  Please sign up for the walk at the Library as space may be limited.  Walk participants are encouraged to carpool, bring a snack, and dress for the weather.

For more information contact Cynthia Weigel, 413-256-4606.

This program is part of the Virginia Davis Memorial Lecture Series, which is funded by her generous bequest. Happi Cramer, long-time friend of Ms. Davis, will share memories before the program. Refreshments will be served.

26 October — “Haunted Wistariahurst!”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 5 – 10 pm

On Saturday, October 26, from 5:00 – 10:00 p.m., the Holyoke High School Theater Company will present Haunted Wistariahurst! Advanced ticket purchases are strongly encouraged. Tickets are $10. Reservations are made through timed tickets, available at 15 minute increments between 5:00 and 9:30 PM. Ticket sale proceeds will benefit the HHS Theater Company and Wistariahurst.

For one spooky night only, the Holyoke High School Theater Company will take over the historic mansion at Wistariahurst to turn it into a fearsome and frightening haunted house for your Halloween delight! Special guest tour guides will take you through the old Skinner house, transformed into a nightmare!

The Holyoke High School Theater Company is a student club that produces at least two theatrical productions annually. The funds raised from the Haunted House will benefit their upcoming production of CLUE ON STAGE. Funds will help pay for costumes, sets, and props.

This event is recommended for ages 10 and up with parental discretion. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit: www.Wistariahurst.org.

25 October — “Scars of Slavery”
History Bites Lunchtime Lecture Series
at the Woodbury Room, Jones Library, Amherst, 12:15 pm

with Bruce Laurie

On July 4, 1863, one of the most widely read magazines in the country during the Civil War published an image capturing the abhorrent cruelties of slavery – the side portrait of an escaped slave with terrifying, streaking scars across his back caused by a whipping from his owner.

The day after the Battle of Gettysburg ended, Harper’s Weekly published “A Typical Negro,” which included the image of the tortured former slave. He was misidentified as Gordon (his name was Peter), and the photo was accompanied by a narrative that bore little resemblance to the facts. It did, however, provide readers in the North with some of the most powerful visual evidence of the wickedness of slavery and the abuses that slaves endured.

Recent research by Bruce Laurie, professor emeritus of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, into two local men who fought for the Union Army during the Civil War era – Henry S. Gere of Northampton and Marshall S. Stearns of Northfield – provided new clues about the true identity of the former slave brought to national attention by Harper’s.

Please note:  this talk will be in the Woodbury Room at the Jones Library.

Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at amhersthistory.org.

20 October — “350 Years in 90 Minutes: Historical Walking Tour of Downtown Northampton”
Historic Northampton
meet at Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 8:30 am

Elizabeth Sharpe, co-director of Historic Northampton and historian, will lead a walking tour of downtown Northampton in conjunction with the exhibit, Making it on Main Street.

Pre-registration required. Limited to 15.
$8 members & donors;
$12 non-members.

Sponsored by Joe’s Cafe.

20 October — 15th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair
Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers
at Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust St,  Northampton, 10 am – 4 pm

Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers invite all to attend!

15th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair, Sunday, October 20, 2019, 10 am to 4 pm, Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust St,  Northampton, Massachusetts.

http://www.pioneervalleybookfair.com

30 regional dealers offering antiquarian, modern, collectible, rare, scholarly, fine, & used books, manuscripts, ephemera, prints, maps, autographs, sheet music, postcards, photographs in every imaginable subject.

Admission is $6, ages 12-21 $3, under 12 free; $1 off with card, coupon, or printout from website.

We hope to host you this Sunday.

Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers, http://www.sneab.com

20 October — “18th Century Medical Practices”
Worthington Historical Society, 6 Williamsburg Rd., Worthington, 6:30 pm

Barbara Mathews, Ph.D., Public Historian at Historic Deerfield, will speak on 18th-Century medical practices  drawing from the journal of Elihu Ashley, a doctor’s apprentice in Western Massachusetts from 1773-1775.  Sunday, October 20th, 6:30 PM at the Worthington Historical Society, 6 Williamsburg Rd., Worthington, MA.

Kate Ewald, Worthington Historical Society

19 October — “A Far Away War Comes Home: Southwick & Hatfield Soldiers in WWI”
Southwick Historical Society
at Southwick Town Hall Auditorium, Southwick, 2 pm

Presented by Rob Wilson.
World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.
Information about WORLD WAR I Veterans will be shared.
Everyone welcome!
Refreshments will be served.
A donation would be gratefully received.
For more information, call: 413-569-2012
SOUTHWICK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC.
SOUTHWICK MASSACHUSETTS
WWW.SOUTHWICKHISTORICALSOCIETY.ORG

19 October — “History Lives in Forestdale Cemetery”
Wistariahurst Museum
meet at the Entrance to Forestdale Cemetery, Sycamore & Cabot Sts., Holyoke

On Saturday, October 19, 2019, Wistariahurst will host “History Lives in Forestdale Cemetery: A Walk Amidst the Gravestones” with tours beginning at 4:00, 5:00, and 6:00 p.m.

Monuments, Markers, Crypts and Crosses are but a few of the sights you will see on this insightful walk through Forestdale Cemetery with City Historian Penni Martorell and Wistariahurst volunteers. Find out the history of some of Holyoke’s founding families and learn some of the facts of death and dying in the 19th century.

The tour will meet and begin at the Entrance to Forestdale Cemetery near the corner of Sycamore and Cabot Streets. Parking is available along Sycamore Street.

Advance reservations are required and can be made online at http://www.Wistariahurst.org. Tickets are $15 and $12 for Wistariahurst members, students, and seniors.

In case of inclement weather, tours will be rescheduled to Sunday, October 20. Ticket holders are encouraged to check http://www.Wistariahurst.org for changes due to weather.

19 October — “Ghosts in the Graveyard”
Longmeadow Historical Society & Longmeadow Cemetery Assoc.

*Rain date October 20*

Tours depart between 6-8 pm ($15 per person)

Tickets available through Eventbrite on the Longmeadow Historical Society Facebook Page under “EVENTS” or at: longmeadowhistoricalsociety.org under “EVENTS”

For questions, contact The Longmeadow Historical Society at 567-3600 or LongmeadowHS@gmail.com

19 October — Variety Show & Silent Auction
Buckland Historical Society
Buckland Public Hall, 15 Upper St., Buckland, 7 pm

We are raising money to save and restore the Wilder Homestead English Barn.
Come and enjoy a spectacular evening of home grown entertainment, plus Silent Auction, Popcorn, and Snacks.

Tickets are available at the Buckland Library or at the show.
$10 general admission
$5 under 18 and over 65

Polly Anderson 413-625-9763

13 October — 4th Annual Migrations Festival
Great Hall, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A, Turners Falls, 2-4 pm

We would be honored for you to join us at the 4th Annual Migrations Festival, a celebration of human and natural diversity of the upper Connecticut River Valley and the Americas. Come enjoy music by the youth of Musica Franklin, traditional Central and South American music by Juan-Carlos Carpio, light refreshments and art from Central America. Free and open to all. This event is a collaboration of DCR, Montague Catholic Social Ministries, RiverCulture, the Guatemala Art and Culture Connection and the people of Turners Falls.

13 October — “Native American Life during the Early Archaic Period: A View from Northampton”
Historic Northampton & Forbes Library
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge Street, Northampton, 4:30 pm

A Public Talk by David Leslie. Last fall, in accordance with state and federal regulations, the MA Department of Transportation hired Dave Leslie, a lead archaeologist with Archeological and Historical Services, Inc., to conduct a preliminary assessment of an area in Northampton where a new roadway construction project is planned. His investigation included digging a series of small test pits, some of which uncovered Native American artifacts dating to the Early Archaic Period. This September Leslie returned to the site to conduct a more thorough excavation.

In conjunction with Massachusetts Archaeology Month, Leslie will present his findings and explain what this site reveals about Native Americans during this time period.

Pre-registration required. Limited to 50.
$5 Members and donors of Historic Northampton.
$5 Friends of Forbes Library and students with a valid ID.
$10 all others.

Sponsored by Mass Humanities.

13 October — Rolls-Royce in Springfield Car Show
Springfield Museums, 21 Edwards St., Springfield, 10 am – 2 pm

A decade ago, to announce the Springfield Museums’ newest museum, The Republican featured a front-page photograph of a 1928 Springfield-made Rolls-Royce. The magnificent car was a gift from M. Allen Swift, which had pride of place in the brand-new Lyman and Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History. It was soon joined by another Springfield-made Rolls-Royce, the 1925 Silver Ghost previously owned by Friendly Ice Cream co-founder S. Prestley Blake. The first new museum on the Quadrangle in seventy-five years, the Springfield History Museum was poised to celebrate the rich history of innovation and entrepreneurship in the city General George Washington pinpointed as a crucial crossroad for the independence of our nation. Ten years later, the museum continues to shed light on the City of Firsts and salute the ongoing spirit of cooperation, innovation, and quality workmanship that make Springfield thrive.

Saturday, October 13, from 10 am to 2 pm, the Springfield Museums will celebrate not only the 10th anniversary of the Wood Museum of Springfield History but also the 100th anniversary of the opening of the American Rolls-Royce Factory right here in Springfield. Mayor Domenic Sarno will declare October 13th Rolls-Royce Day. The festivities will include a tour of the Wood Museum of Springfield History’s automobile collection at 11 am, led by docent Jerre Hoffman, and a book-signing by Pres Blake, a proud Rolls-Royce owner and co-founder of Friendly Ice Cream.

In the early 1900s UK-based Rolls-Royce recognized the United States as a fertile market for their automobile. When they considered where to manufacture their American-made cars, they chose Springfield, Massachusetts, not least because of the abundance of skilled workmen. To this day, Springfield is the only place outside England that Rolls-Royce cars have ever been built.

Few companies personify the marriage of manufacturing and artistry as graciously as Rolls-Royce. Come see Saturday, October 13, when members of the Yankee Region of The Rolls-Royce Owners Club bring their magnificent cars to the North Lawn of the Museums. Special guest lectures and memorabilia displays will round out the day.

·         11 am: Tour Automobile Hall with Jerre Hoffman
·         1-2 pm,: Book signing with Pres Blake, author of A Friendly Life, and co-founder of Friendly Ice Cream
·         Time to be determined:  J.E. Robison will speak about the history of the Rolls-Royce Factory on Hendee Street.
·         Time to be determined: B.J. Jefferson will discuss the Rolls-Royce restoration process

Car Show Admission (includes Wood Museum of Springfield History)
$10 for adults
$5 for children 3-17
Free for Museum members or with museum admission

12 October — “Architectural Geology: Building Stones of Northampton”
Historic Northampton
meet at Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge Street, Northampton, 9 am

A Walking Tour with John Brady. Join John Brady, recently retired geologist from Smith College, on a 90-minute tour of downtown Northampton. Learn about the geologic origins of the stone blocks used to build some of the City’s most iconic downtown buildings, from the Court House and First Churches to City Hall and beyond. On this tour, John will expand your view of Northampton and reveal connections to more than 400 million years of earth history.

Pre-registration required. Limited to 15. $8 members & donors; $12 all others.

Sponsored by D.A. Sullivan & Sons.

23 September thru 11 October — “Waging Peace in Vietnam”
Integrated Learning Center, UMass Amherst

A New Exhibit at UMass Amherst! “Waging Peace in Vietnam,” an exhibit documenting the antiwar dissent of active duty military personnel and veterans during the Vietnam War, will be on display at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst from September 23 through October 11 in the main lobby of the Integrated Learning Center. Assembled by Ron Carver, the exhibit features photographs, underground newspapers, and other documents from this bold and little-known movement. Undergraduate students, trained by the UMass Amherst history department, will serve as docents for the exhibit.

11 October — Panel Discussion: Moral Injury and the Traumas of War
Room E470, South College, UMass Amherst, 7 pm

A panel discussion with Doug Anderson (poet and combat medic in the Vietnam War), Ross Caputi (Iraq War veteran and PhD candidate in history, UMass Amherst), Robert Meagher (Hampshire College professor and expert on the traumas of war), Karen Skolfield (Army veteran and poet, UMass College of Engineering Junior Writing Program), and Wayne Smith (community activist and former combat medic in Vietnam), moderated by Khary Polk (Amherst College).

11 October — Community Reading of the Massachusetts Constitution
Plainfield Historical Society & Shaw Memorial Library
at Plainfield Town Hall, Plainfield, 6-8 pm

When was the last time you read our own Constitution?

Join is for a community reading and discussion of the MA Constitution of 1780 (abridged) on October 11, 6-8 pm, Town Hall.

Details at:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1106738386186820/

All over 12 are welcome! Please pass the word.

9 October — Design and Construction of Windsor Chairs: Demo and Talk
Clapp Memorial Library, 19 South Main St., Belchertown, 7 pm

Join Patrick Perkins for an engaging evening as he shares his knowledge and experience designing and building Windsor chairs. Perkins built his first Windsor chair in the 1980’s and has continued to build chairs in several different styles using the same techniques and tools used throughout the 18th century. Try your hand with some of the tools at this interactive presentation.

8 October — “The 1979 Greensboro Massacre: Lessons for Today”
UMass Afro-American Studies Department, History Department, & Resistance Studies Initiative
New Africa House Theater, UMass

Please join us for a presentation and dialogue featuring the acclaimed civil rights leaders, Rev. Nelson and Dr. Joyce Johnson of the Beloved Community Center in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Johnsons are survivors of the 1979 massacre, when a car caravan of Ku Klux Klansmen and neo-Nazis attacked a peaceful gathering of anti-racists in a Black community. The gunmen shot and killed five radical young labor organizers and wounded ten others, but were acquitted twice by all-white juries. A path-breaking civil rights suit demonstrated collusion between local law enforcement and the white supremacists; Greensboro subsequently became the first community in the U.S. to use a Truth and Reconciliation process to get “closer to the truth” of what happened on that day.

Today the Johnsons lead regional struggles for justice in cases of police brutality, homelessness, education, and denial of immigrant rights. They are core organizers with Rev. William Barber of The Poor People’s Campaign. They will speak to the lessons for today’s movements that they have gleaned from forty years of struggle against white supremacist violence, institutional racism, and anti-unionism.

Location and Access Information: There is a PVTA stop near New Africa House (Studio Arts Building/Fine Arts Center). Metered parking is available at the Robsham Visitors Center (300 Massachusetts Ave), the Campus Center Parking Garage (1 Campus Center Way), Infirmary Road, and Thatcher Road. Accessible parking is available nearby at Infirmary Way and Franklin Dining Commons (151 Presidents Drive). See map or interactive campus map for details. New Africa House is a wheelchair accessible building.

5 October — “Making Books on Main Street: Publishers, Printers, Bookbinders, and Booksellers in Northampton”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge Street, Northampton, 4:30 pm

Postponed

A Presentation by Barbara B. Blumenthal. Historic Northampton trustee Barbara B. Blumenthal will tell the story of publishers, printers, and binders in Northampton from the 18th century to the present. She will concentrate on 18th-19th century bookseller Simeon Butler and his successors; The Hampshire Bookshop (in Northampton 1916-1971); and the ongoing legacy of book arts in the Connecticut River Valley.

Limited Seating. First come, first served.
$5 members & donors;
$10 non-members.

Sponsored by Goggins Real Estate.

4 October — Film Screening: Combat Obscura
Room W245, South College, UMass Amherst, 7 pm

Screening of Combat Obscura, a 2018 documentary by former combat videographer Miles Lagoze exploring the daily life of U.S. Marines in Afghanistan. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the director.

2 October — Film Screening: Why We Fight
Room W245, South College, UMass Amherst, 7 pm

Screening of Why We Fight, the award-winning 2005 documentary film by Eugene Jarecki examining attitudes about U.S. wars since the 1950s.

SEPTEMBER 2019

30 September — “Red Summer: Racial Turmoil of 1919”
Storrs Library and the Longmeadow Historical Society
Betty Ann Low Meeting Rm, Storrs Library, Longmeadow, 6:30 pm

Join us on Monday, September 30 from 6:30 to 7:30 to welcome Cliff McCarthy to Storrs Library for an engaging program on the Red Summer. The summer of 1919 was marked by race riots that spread across the United States. Largely forgotten and erased from our collective memory, these events presented a devastating view of the nation that was attempting to sell the League of Nations as a road map to a more just and peaceful world. This program is proudly sponsored by Storrs Library and the Longmeadow Historical Society.

About our speaker: Cliff McCarthy is the Archivist at the Lyman & Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History and at the Stone House Museum in Belchertown. He is also a Founder and former President of the Pioneer Valley History Network, a not-for-profit consortium of historical institutions and individuals in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin Counties. Cliff is the author or co-author of several books on the history of Belchertown.

28 September — “Furniture Making in 1700s Northampton: Making a Replica of the Sarah Strong Chest”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

A Public Talk and Demonstration by Sharon Mehrman

One of Historic Northampton’s most prized artifacts is the Sarah Strong chest, which we believe was made in Northampton about 1700. Professional woodworker Sharon Mehrman will describe how she painstakingly constructed a 7/8 scale replica of the Sarah Strong chest, demonstrate some of the historic woodworking techniques she used, and discuss what she has learned about early American joinery by making the replica.

$5 members and donors; $10 all others.
Sponsored by Sugar Maple Trailside Inn.

28 September — “Annual Pelham Harvest Supper and Pie Auction”
Pelham Historical Society
Pelham Historic Complex, 377 Amherst Rd., Pelham, 6:30 pm

Annual Harvest Supper and Howard D. Barnes Memorial Pie Auction. Come join the community for a hearty New England boiled dinner, served in the oldest continuously-used Town Hall in the nation!  Come early to see the exhibits in our museum!

Following the dinner and dessert, Stan Rosenberg will entertain and delight us with the auction of our handcrafted pies.

For tickets contact: Chris Gould, 413-253-9162  or Bruce Klotz, 413-253-1601

28 September — Trolleyfest
Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum, Shelburne Falls, 11 am – 5 pm

One hundred and twenty three years ago, the Wason Manufacturing Co. of Springfield, MA manufactured and sent to the Shelburne Falls and Colrain Street Railway Co. a new state of the art trolley car, which featured electric lights and electric heaters.  This Trolley Car, the first car acquired by the new railway company served its namesake towns of Shelburne Falls and Colrain for 30 years until 1928, has never left the valley and spent 20 years of its life crossing on the Deerfield River on the bridge now known world-wide as “The Bridge Of Flowers”.

When the trolley company failed in 1928, all of its assets were sold for scrap, except Trolley No. 10, which was saved by the Johnson family of Colrain and moved to their farm to serve as a chicken coop, tool shed, and other various uses for the next 65 years, at which time it was donated to the fledgling Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum.  After a complete restoration, Trolley No 10 was returned to service on October 9, 1999, and has operated ever since at the museum.

On Saturday, September 28, the museum will hold its annual Trolleyfest celebration of the restoration of No. 10 from 11 am until 5 pm.  Museum visitors will be able to ride on No. 10 and the pump car, visit the restored Central Vermont caboose, and Speeder rides will also be available.

From 11 am until 3 pm, there will be hands-on demonstrations of cider making, butter making, tool making, weaving, and a milk a “Cow” activity for the young folks.  Also the younger visitors, there are toy and electric trains to operate in the Visitors Center. The gift shop will be open all day and music will be provided by “Whistlestop” from 11 am until 3 pm.  At 1:15 pm, local author Marie Betts Bartlett will read her book “The Little Yellow Trolley”.

New to this year’s celebration will be “pocket pies” from Mo’s Fudge Factor in Buckland.  Mo’s pies are modeled after traditional “hand pies” which became common in the 19 century England, where Cornish tin miners would eat them for lunch-prepared and packed by their wives. Mo’s is carrying on the tradition to honor our local farmers.  Using a buttery homemade crust, these pies are exploding with fresh seasonal fruits from our local farms.  For this year’s Trolleyfest, Mo’s will be making Apple pies (Apex Orchard), Roasted tomato, caramelized onion, and goat cheese pie (Natural Roots and Thomas Farms), and Shepard pies (Natural Roots and Ciesluks Farms).  Stop by and enjoy one of these seasonal, scrumptious pies for lunch.

Don’t forget to visit the Hugh Railroad Tag Sale and also participate in the Trolleyfest raffle which is working to find funds for placing a picnic table on the museum grounds so it can be enjoyed by visitors and town folks as well. Many local restaurants have donated gift cards (West End Pub, Lazy Taco, Terrazza’s in Greenfield and Munich Haus in Chicopee).  Certificates are also available for the Conway Scenic Railroad, Magic Wings in S. Deerfield, and copies of “The Builders of the Hoosac Tunnel”. More items are being added daily.

Railroad movies will be shown throughout the day and Reenactors from the Trolley Era will be on the grounds and rides.  Visit and see how people of Shelburne Falls lived and traveled in the Trolley Era from 1896 to 1927.

All day passes for adults are only $4.00, youth only $2.00 and six and under are free.  For more details Visit: http://www.sftm.org

27 September — Book Launch and Panel Discussion: Patriotic Dissent
Room N151, Integrative Learning Center, UMass Amherst, 4:30 pm

To launch the exhibit “Waging Peace in Vietnam” and the companion book by the same name, Ron Carver (exhibit curator and co-editor, Waging Peace in Vietnam), Susan Schnall (former Navy nurse court-martialed for her antiwar activism) and W.E. Ehrhart (Vietnam veteran and distinguished poet/writer) will engage in a panel discussion of patriotic dissent. The discussion will be moderated by Christian Appy (historian of the Vietnam War and Professor of History at UMass Amherst).

25 September — “Mill River Greenway Initiative—Looking Toward the Future of the Mill River”
Northampton Senior Center, 67 Conz St., Northampton, 5:30-7:30 pm

John Sinton, author of the acclaimed Devil’s Den to Lickingwater: The Mill River Through Landscape & History, and co-moderator of the Mill River Greenway Initiative, will share a fascinating history of the River and its impact on the city’s development. “We will see how the Mill River dictated Northampton’s street pattern and peculiar shape,” Sinton states. Other topics he plans to cover include the city’s frequent flooding, the location of “Little Venice” and the diversions of 1710 and 1940. “The 1940 diversion of the Mill River out of downtown Northampton,” he notes, “marked a turning point in the River’s story, but not its final chapter.” The presentation will end with his question: “Why does the Mill River matter?”

Free and open to the public, his talk kicks off the second season of the popular Speakers Series, featuring prominent local and regional personalities, sponsored by Northampton Neighbors and the Senior Center.

24 September — “Western Massachusetts Baseball”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6 pm

A Brief Look with Kevin Larkin

On Tuesday, September 24 from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host Western Massachusetts Baseball: A Brief Look with Kevin Larkin, a historical lecture as part of the Wistariahurst Historical Lecture Series People, Places, Food, & Sport. A donation of $5 is suggested. Kevin Larkin will be speaking about the history of baseball in Western Massachusetts, including players, teams and ballparks as well as members of the Hall of Fame and black baseball in the area.

ABOUT KEVIN LARKIN

Kevin Larkin has been going to baseball games since he was five years old. He is a baseball fan who loves the Yankees but loves to watch the sport no matter who is playing. He has authored/co-authored five books on baseball and writes articles for the Society of American Baseball research. He has presented all over Western Massachusetts about the sport he loves. His first book, Baseball in the Baystate is a history of the sport in the Commonwealth. Berkshire County’s Field of Dreams Part One and Part Two, is about the history of one of the country’s oldest ballparks, Wahconah Park in Pittsfield.

21 September — Wistariahurst Landscape Tour
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 10:30- 11:30 am

On Saturday, September 21 from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., join Wistariahurst’s curator, along with a master gardener on a 45-minute walking tour of the 2.3+ acre property to learn about the evolution of the landscape over its 140+years. Hear stories about the about the vines, the wooden area, the victory garden, and the tea house. Discover the lions, the spirit gate and the dinosaur tracks.  Learn about the historical and contemporary planning and planting and hear how a dedicated team of volunteers in the 21st century have restored and maintained this beautiful environment.

Named after the wisteria vine that flowers in May, Wistariahurst was home to two generations of the Skinner family who loved to garden.  Begun by Sarah Skinner in the late 19th Century and then transformed by her daughter Belle Skinner in the early 20th, the grounds and gardens have always been an integral part of the life and activities at Wistariahurst.

Advance ticket purchase is encouraged. Tickets can be purchased online at http://www.Wistariahurst.org Tickets are $10 and $7 for students, seniors, and Wistariahurst Museum members.

19 September — “Power Town History Stroll”
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, 5 – 7 pm

Meet at the Main Entrance to the Center, and enjoy a walk back in time along the popular Canalside Rail Trail in Turners Falls. Join local historian Ed Gregory, Northfield Mountain’s Kim Noyes, and DCR’s Janel Nockleby to discover the rich and colorful industrial history along this scenic paved path. Historical maps and photographs will help bring the sights and sounds of our industrial heritage alive. Wear comfortable walking shoes and meet at the entrance to the Center. Total walking distance is about two miles on flat terrain. Wheelchair accessible. For ages 16 and up. Program is free. Pre-registration encouraged, but not required. Call 800-859-2960.

19 September — “Performing Blackness: An Arts Expo and Curator Talk”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6-9 pm

On Thursday, September 19 from 6:00 – 9:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host “Performing Blackness: An Arts Expo and Curator Talk” in the Belle Skinner Music Room. Black Holyoke researcher, oral historian, and Reliquary of Blackness exhibit curator Erika Slocumb will present her work at this showcase of art and music. Special musical guest Vélez will perform and guests will have the opportunity to purchase pieces from local artists. There will be a cash bar. This event is free and open to the public.

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This program is supported in part by a grant from the Holyoke Local Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

ABOUT VÉLEZ
Accomplished multi-instrumentalist and writer, Vélez, spreads light and love with every downbeat. Guitar in hand, he moves and shakes with a presence that is “light as a feather yet soulful and sincere”, weaving sounds within a texture of Story, Soul and electric neo-blues energy. Accompanied by “desire and heartbreak, Vélez seduces the crowd with a raspy and romantic style of singing”, and his thoughtful lyricism is amplified by an expansive vocal range and dynamic presence.

Prior to his days as bandleader, Vélez studied Music Theory/Composition and Jazz Performance at Brown University and Manhattan School of Music, respectively. Influenced by a wide swath of textures and timbres, he paints with harmony that is neither predictable nor pretentious. The most enduring impression is etched by his “raspy, romantic style of singing”, and the adventurous spirit with which he improvises. Vélez transmutes pain and passion into poetry, accompanied by his guitar and the secrets they share.

ABOUT ERIKA SLOCUMB
Erika Slocumb is an artist and Ph.D. candidate in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her research has focused on the lives of Black people in Western Massachusetts. Currently she is working on uncovering the history of Black people in Holyoke Massachusetts, in conjunction with the Holyoke community and the Wistariahurst Museum. She has received background Holyoke history and archival training from Holyoke historian and archivist Penni Martorell, and most recently Oral History training from leading oral historian Annie Valk. Ms. Slocumb has presented at the Massachusetts History Conference, the UMass DuBois Department Graduate Symposium, as well as with the Holyoke High School Ethnic Studies Program. This fall Erika will present her research and collaborative work with Wistariahurst, to students at Smith College.

18 September — “Edgar Allen Poe”
Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation, 42 Water St., Granville, 6:30 pm

Campbell Harmon appears in costume and persona as the legendary Master of Macabre and founder of the modern horror genre.

Mr. Harmon has performed as Edgar Allan Poe since 2009.   Come be captivated as this great writer is brought to life in dramatic readings, historical biography and direct audience interaction. Edgar Allan Poe and his genius still resonates after 160 years.  Prepare to be amazed!

This NCCHP living history event is free to museum members and free will donations from others of $10 to offset appearance fees are appreciated.  Light refreshments will be served after the program.

Our monthly programs are made possible in part by grants from the Granville Cultural Council and donations from members and friends of the museum.  Thanks in advance for your support to keep history alive!

Visit www.ncchp.org for more information or call 413-357-6321.

17 September — “Historic Court Cases of Hampshire County, 1654 – present”
Hampshire Co. Bar Assoc. & Historic Northampton
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 6-8 pm

Join Mike Ryan, former Hampshire County District Attorney and retired judge, for a review of some of the most significant cases in Hampshire County’s 400-year history–from witch trials and executions to historic cases involving fashion, frauds, civil rights and protests.

Reservations Recommended. Limited to 35.
Register by email at hcba@crocker.com.
Fee: $10.

15 September — Fall Party and Wine Tasting!
Hatfield Historical Society
at Black Birch Vineyard, 108 Straits Rd., Hatfield, 5:30 – 8 pm

Come join us for our 2nd annual fall wine tasting party to celebrate local history and support the work of the Hatfield Historical Society. A lovely fall evening, sipping wine (or cider), listening to the LaRK Jazz Trio with friends and new friends, and sampling hors d’oeuvres from the Black Sheep Deli. What could be better?

Note: This is a 21+ event

$30.00 per person ticket includes hors d’oeuvres and samples of 5 pre-selected wines or a glass of wine of your choosing (or apple cider or soft drinks). Capacity is limited, though, so don’t wait too long to buy a ticket!

Tickets are available by calling or e-mailing 413-348-6979; BryanNicholas@comcast.net, by buying a ticket at one of our museums during open hours (check this website for hours: hatfieldhistory.weebly.com), or at the door. We hope to see you!

14 September — Amherst Walking Tour
Jones Library, 43 Amity St., Amherst, 10 am

Join us on Saturday, September 14th at 10 am for an Amherst Walking Tour. In celebration of our centennial, the library has developed a guided historical tour of downtown Amherst highlighting sites with connections to the Jones Library. The tour will begin in front of the library and is about 1 mile of walking and standing for approximately 1.5 hours. Space is limited and advanced registration is required. To register, please call Jones Library Special Collections at 413-259-3097 or email specialcollections@joneslibrary.org.

Free and open to the public with advanced registration.  For more information, please contact Cynthia Harbeson at 413/259-3097.

14 September — “Alvah Crocker: From the Rugged Hand of Poverty to Visionary Leader”
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, 1 – 3 pm

Cliff Schexnayder, author of Builders of the Hoosac Tunnel, presents why Alvah Crocker is an example of what today is termed a “lifelong learner.” Because of his lonely travels on bad roads to sell his paper he understood the importance of transportation. But during those travels he was observant of nature and the opportunities it provided. From personal experience he learned the physics of water to provide energy for mills and to destroy mills. As a visionary for progress he sought out and associated with similar hard working individuals. These relationships of mutual support benefited all and resulted in – a railroad across northern Massachusetts to New York and the creation of Turners Falls Company. Find out more about these two examples and Crocker’s early life, with plenty of time for Q & A.

14 September — “350 Years in 90 Minutes: Historical Walking Tour of Downtown Northampton”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 8:30 – 10 am

Elizabeth Sharpe, co-director of Historic Northampton and historian, will lead a walking tour of downtown Northampton in conjunction with the exhibit, Making it on Main Street.

Pre-registration required. Limited to 15.
$8 members & donors;
$12 non-members.
Sponsored by Greenfield Savings Bank.

14 September — “Indigenous Northampton in the 19th Century: Revisiting the History of Sally Maminash”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 4:30 pm

A Public Talk by Dr. Margaret Bruchac.

One of the most intriguing gravestones in Northampton’s Bridge Street Cemetery belongs to Sally Maminash (1765-1853), a Mohegan/Nonotuck woman identified as “The last of the Indians here. A niece of Occum. A Christian.” Newspaper stories recount cryptically tragic details: her mother Elizabeth murdered; her father’s gravestone stolen; and Sally trapped in a lonely corner of the room, reading her Bible. Dr. Margaret Bruchac revisits the writings of local town historians to show how seemingly “unknown” Indigenous histories can often be recovered by dismantling the romantic stereotypes that situated Native peoples in distant times and locales.

Pre-registration strongly encouraged. Limited to 60.
$5 members, donors & students with valid ID;
$10 all others.
Sponsored by Mass Humanities.

11 September — “Exploring Look Park with an Eye on History & Nature”
Historic Northampton
at Look Park, Northampton, 1-3 pm

with Laurie Sanders of Historic Northampton

During the last 150 years, the 130-acres that make up Look Park have undergone a series of transformations – from farm fields and pasture to golf course to park. Historic Northampton co-director and naturalist Laurie Sanders will help reveal the park’s history and how it has shaped the landscape and plants and animals we see today.

Advance Tickets Required.
Purchase tickets with Look Park by September 6th.
Limited to 25 | Fee: $10.

7 September — “Beyond the Bicep: The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, One Armory Square, Suite 2, Springfield, 2 pm

Join Amanda Goodheart Parks for her presentation, “Beyond the Bicep: The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter” on Saturday, September 7 at 2 pm. Presentation will take place in the museum theater. Seating is limited, please call the museum to make reservations. Admission is free.

Her image has adorned everything from lunchboxes to lampshades, but what is the real story of Rosie the Riveter. Her journey will be traced from propaganda poster to feminist icon while uncovering the history of the real life Rosies who not only inspired that infamous bicep, but whose work in wartime industries helped secure an Allied victory during WWII.

Presenter Amanda Goodheart Parks has studied the history of women and gender for more than a decade. She earned her Ph.D in History and has worked as a public historian, museum educator, and historical interpreter at museums and historic sites throughout southern New England. She currently serves as the Director of Education at the New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks, CT.

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of our Nation’s first armory, established in 1794. Managed with the Commonwealth of MA, Springfield Technical Community College and the National Park Service, it is the home of the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. The site is currently open seven days a week from, 9 AM- 5 PM. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check http://www.nps.gov/spar.

7 September — Longmeadow Graveyard Tour
Longmeadow Historical Society
at the West entrance, behind First Church, 763 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, 9 am

Join Longmeadow Historical Society Board member, Al McKee for a personalized 45 minute to one hour walk around the old burying ground section of the Longmeadow Cemetery. Meet at the West entrance of the cemetery (behind First Church at 763 Longmeadow Street). Tour will include information about the history of the burying ground, symbolism on gravestones, information about who carved the gravestones, causes of death and new information learned form LiDAR studies and ground penetrating radar.

Tour group is limited to 20 people. Please register – $10.00 per person. This event is appropriate for children aged 12 and older. Participants should be able to walk a mile without assistance. Consider bringing sunscreen and bug spray.

Rain Date: SUNDAY, September 8th. Tour is from 9 am to about 10 am.

Sign up on Eventbrite. On the Eventbrite site, search for events in Longmeadow, use “Tour” for filter.

AUGUST 2019

27 August 2019 — “The Rise and Fall of Professional Soccer in Holyoke”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6 pm

On Tuesday, August 27, 2019 from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host a lecture entitled The Rise and Fall of Professional Soccer in Holyoke as part of the ongoing Wistariahurst historical lecture series People, Places, Food, & Sport. The lecture will be presented by Brian Bunk, Senior Lecturer of History at UMass Amherst.

People in Holyoke have been playing soccer for more than 125 years. Clubs like the Rangers, Clan MacClaren and Farr Alpaca competed against teams in the Pioneer Valley and beyond. This talk will trace the early history of the sport in the city including the region’s first professional club – the Holyoke Falcos.

A donation of $5 is suggested.

25 August 2019 — Open Houses
Buckland Historical Society, 2 – 4 pm

The Buckland Historical Society Museum – a former circa 1865 school house which now houses three floors of artifacts and town records.
20 Upper St., Buckland Center, MA

The Wilder Homestead – a furnished 1775 saltbox with five fireplaces, a 1779 English barn featuring a Weaving Demonstration on a barn loom, and a shoemaker shop.
129 Rt. 112, Buckland, MA

24 August — 2nd Annual Irish Cultural Festival
Irish Cultural Center, 429 Morgan Rd., West Springfield

The Irish Cultural Center of Western New England, along with Black Rose Academy of Irish Dance and Cassin Academy of Irish Dance, is excited to present the second annual Irish cultural festival at the ICC on Saturday, August 24, 2019.

The Saturday festival will be a day of Irish music, dance, and culture. This family friendly event will have something for everyone. A trad Irish seisiún will open the festival. The Cassin Academy of Irish Dance and Black Rose Academy of Irish Dance will present dance exhibitions. Visitors can learn Irish dance, visit vendors of Irish crafts and products, and participate in workshops featuring Irish arts and language, and music and entertainment throughout the day.

The events will take place rain or shine on the field on the ICC grounds at 429 Morgan Road in West
Springfield. There will be a variety of food trucks and concession stands, along with beer and drinks
for sale. Parking will be available at the pavilion lot behind the ICC, and also at West Springfield High
School with a shuttle service.

Tickets (cash only) are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 6–12, and free for children 5 and under.

18 July thru 18 August — “Stitch By Stitch: Needlework from the Wistariahurst Collection”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke

Guest curator — Joanne Picard

“Stitch by Stitch” features selections from Wistariahurst’s textile collection, including samplers from what are now the United States and the United Kingdom. These samplers date from approximately 1690 through 1850 and reflect a range of styles. The exhibit will illustrate components, look at who made samplers, and discuss how they were made and why. It will examine how sampler designs and motifs reflected the lives and beliefs of their makers and provide visitors with an opportunity to try their hand at cross stitch and other patterns.

Joanne Picard has been studying and reproducing historic samplers for more than 30 years. She was initially attracted to them by the variations in alphabet styles, the range of colors (though now often faded), and the questions they raised about the identities and lives of their makers. Reproducing a historic sampler requires a close examination of the original pattern that often illuminates details of design and construction that might otherwise be overlooked. It also requires an attention to detail that one imagines some girls found boring and repetitive, and others, including Joanne, found rewarding and relaxing. Joanne has demonstrated needlework at several historic house museums, and she has been a volunteer in the curatorial department at Naumkeag in Stockbridge. She is currently a volunteer in the Wistariahurst archives.

“Stitch by Stitch” will be on display from Thursday, July 18 through Sunday, August 18. The exhibit will be open to the public during Wistariahurst’s self-guided tour open hours, Sunday – Wednesday from 12:00 – 4:00 pm. A suggested donation of $3 is encouraged.

11 August — Open House
Buckland Historical Society
Buckland, 2 – 4 pm

The Buckland Historical Society Museum – a former circa 1865 school house which now houses three floors of artifacts and town records.
20 Upper St., Buckland Center, MA

The Wilder Homestead – a furnished 1775 saltbox with five fireplaces, a 1779 English barn with a weaving demo on a barn loom, and a shoemaker shop.
129 Rt. 112, Buckland, MA

10 August — “A Visit to Pelham’s Quaker Cemetery”
Pelham Historical Society
meet at the former United Church of Pelham, Meeting House Rd & Amherst Rd.

Rain Date: 3 PM Sunday, August 11

In 1806, Quaker Eseck Cook came to Pelham, where he was instrumental in gathering together a small society of his faith.  We will carpool to the site and then walk to Pelham’s Quaker Cemetery.

In memory of Roger Conant, Shirley Conant will provide a history of the presence of the Quakers in Pelham, including this visit to their simple wooded cemetery.

For those interested and willing to bushwhack a little, we also will explore the site of Pelham’s former Quaker meeting house.

For more information contact: Linda Campbell Hanscom, 413-323-7377.

6 August — “Exploring Northampton — Nature in Northampton: A Walking Tour with Laurie Sanders”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 12 – 1 pm

Join Laurie Sanders to look for every plant or animal species that survives in downtown, from the mosses and ants living in the cracks and margins to the larger plants and creatures that are able to survive in the wilder and untended pockets that occur in and around the heart of the city. Pre-registration is required.

$5 members and donors
$8 all others

4 August — Concert on the Lawn featuring Livestock
Keep Homestead Museum
35 Ely Rd., Monson, 1:30 pm

Livestock is a group who use traditional bluegrass instrumentation to interpret a somewhat wider musical collection, reaching out into blues, folk, country and rock ‘n roll for their confirmed label of Bluegrass & Americana. The members often play in a number of other formats, as well as share the singing responsibilities. They use old-school ambient mic-ing on stage rather than mounted pickups, for a particularly natural wooden-instrument sound, to seem similar to their favorite settings, which are kitchens, barns, and porches. Their casual approach to a show makes them favorites in social settings like pubs, town commons and the burgeoning music/microbrewery scene.

The concert will be held rain or shine as it can move into the barn. Bring a lawn chair or blanket  –  and a picnic lunch. There is no admission charge, but donations will be accepted. Refreshments will be served.

The air conditioned museum will be open 1:00-3:30. The audience will be surrounded by the Alan Robert Phillips Sculpture Garden. For more information, call 413-267-4137, email khm@keephomesteadmuseum.org or check the web at http://www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

3 August — Magical History Tour
Pioneer Valley History Network
leaves from Wistariahurst, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 9 am – 3:15 pm

Roll Up for the Magical History Tour…Step Right This Way…

PVHN’s Magical History Tour is a bus trip to five area historical museums: Wistariahurst, Historic Northampton, Historical Society of Greenfield, the Museum of Our industrial Heritage, and the Hatfield Historical Society. The date is Saturday, August 3. The cost is only $5, but we hope you might leave small contributions at each stop along the way. This trip is funded by a grant from the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts.

See the latest exhibits!        Go “behind the curtain”

You MUST RSVP by 31 July for this event! You can simply email camcca@charter.net and let us know you’re coming.

3 August — “Black in the Gardens”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 2 – 4 pm

A Celebration of Black Music and Culture

On Saturday, August 3, from 2 – 4 p.m., Wistariahurst will host Black in the Gardens: A Celebration of Black Music and Culture. Join us for a celebration of Black music and culture in the gardens at Wistariahurst! Special guests will include DJ Donnie Dee and Kabisko Kaba. This family friendly event will also include face-painting, African drumming and dance sessions, and a Holyoke history memory station. This event is free and open to the public.

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This program is supported in part by a grant from the Holyoke Local Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

Alpha Kabisko Kaba knowing by Bisko is in 11th-year teacher at PVPA. He is originally from Guinea Conakry, West Africa and has more than 35 years of professional dance and drum experience. Bisko came to the U.S in 1998 with his world-renowned dance company, Les Merveilles de Guinee, touring for many years. in 1999 he began a five-year residency at University Lincoln Center in NYC. He has also been a resident performing artist at Walt Disney World and Disney Land, where he performed daily for patrons. Since 2007 Bisko has lived in Western Massachusetts and has been a resident teaching artist at UMass, Smith College, Mt Holyoke College, and Hampshire College. In 2014 Bisko took 14 high school Students from PVPA to his country Guinea Conakry West Africa for 3 weeks. He is well known for his passion and demonstrated a commitment to excellence in his choreography and storytelling.

Hailing from Paterson, New Jersey by way of western Massachusetts, Donnie Dee specializes in the spinning of Hip Hop, R&B and any music that can move the soul.  He holds two decades as a mobile & mixtape turntablist, song & mixtape producer and has experience with sound engineering.  Having spent many years between Massachusetts & New Jersey playing at many venues (alongside local hard-hitters), providing sound/recording for special events, and compiling his own projects, Donnie has had a lot of time to develop his sound.  For him, it’s all about the sounds that get us together grooving… the ones that we can feel collectively and reinforces our sense of community.

JULY 2019

1 June thru 31 July 2019 — “Plants on Paper: Two Centuries of Collecting, Studying and the Art of the Flora in Plainfield”
Plainfield Historical Society
at the Shaw Memorial Library, 312 Main St., Plainfield

The Plainfield Historical Society presents a two month-longexhibit of a nineteenth-century botanical collection of pressed plants and flowers, manuscripts, books, photographs, and other items from its collection, complemented by botany-themed art by Plainfield residents, from June 1-July 31, at the Shaw Memorial Library.

Join us for the festive opening on Saturday June 1, 9:30 am-12:00 pm, including a formal opening at 10:00 am followed by a nature walk with Nan Childs (rain or shine). Flower themed refreshments will be served.

Did you go botanizing as a child? Dry your flowers in a book? The fields and woods of Plainfield have inspired residents since settlement to collect and dry flowers and leaves, study botany, and make art. These activities have deep roots. The study of Massachusetts
and United States botany flourished from the late eighteenth century, when botanizing became a scientific pursuit, as well as an abiding hobby for many.

Plainfield ’s first doctor, Dr. Jacob Porter, was an avid botanist in close contact with the era’s leading scientists. The Plainfield Historical Society was recently given an “herbarium,” a collection of dried plants and flowers labeled with their scientific names, created in 1854 by Samuel Francis Shaw, Porter’s neighbor and a doctor in the U.S. navy, in the center of Plainfield for a class at Williams College (Shaw grew up in the Shaw Hudson House). The herbarium was lost, saved fortuitously, and found its way to the PHS thanks to Robin Sauve of Longmeadow.

The exhibit is built around the herbarium, with materials on and by Dr. Porter, including a floral calendar of Plainfield, the Shaw family’s pursuit of wildflowers, and art and poetry by later and current Plainfield residents.

The exhibit will be accompanied by a number of programs (see below for details).

The exhibit and events are free and open to the public. Donations to fund care of the PHS and Shaw Hudson House collections will be accepted. This program is funded in part by the Plainfield Cultural Council, which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council For more information, contact PHS curator Pleun Bouricius, pleunbouricius@gmail.com,
413-634-2250.

30 July — Annual Meeting
Plainfield Historical Society
Shaw Hudson House, Plainfield, 7 pm

The Plainfield Historical Society 2019 annual meeting and election will be held on Tuesday, July 30 at 7:00 p.m. at the Shaw Hudson House in the connector between the house and the barn.

We are very fortunate to have Dennis Picard  retired director of the Storrowtown Village Museum in West Springfield, who will give a presentation on the history and significance of some of the tools in the Plainfield Historical Society’s agricultural collection.

These include: hay knives, seed planters, a pressure cooker, broom machine, pod auger, gambrel stick.

This is also an opportunity to become a member or renew your membership. If you cannot attend the meeting, you can renew or start your membership online at https://plainfieldmahistory.org/donate/.

We welcome additional donations.

As you know we are very active in creating events and taking care of the collections. This summer we created an exhibit, Plants on Paper, and its attendant events at the library (tomorrow is your last chance, the library opens at 2 — stop by there before the annual meeting!).

We also host the annual Memorial Day dinner, garden and barn tours, and we have a fabulous website, plainfiueldmahistory.org, where you can find any number or resources in Plainfield history, digitized.

Every Tuesday throughout the year, the collections volunteers meet at the Shaw Hudson House (at the library in the winter) to work on inventorying and housing items from the collections so as to increase access. We have just installed a dehumidifier in our archive room. Although we do everything with volunteer labor and on a shoestring, archival supplies are very expensive.

We hope to see you at this event, and if not, we hope to greet you at another of our events.  Thank you very much for your support.

28 July — Indian Motocycle Day
Springfield Museums, 21 Edwards St., Springfield, 9 am – 3 pm.

Join the Springfield Museums to celebrate the 10th Annual Indian Motocycle Day, Sunday, July 28, 2019, 9 am–3 pm, and take the opportunity to experience a tour led by one of the Indian Motocycle founders George Hendee (portrayed by docent Bobby Girard).

Motorcycle Show & Rally — View a variety of classic and vintage motorcycles, browse vendor displays, a DJ spins classic rock tunes and more.

§  9 am  Welcome and Announcements

§  10:30 am Tribute to Andy Donald 

§  11 am & 1 pm Guided tours of the collection and special exhibit with George Hendee (portrayed by docent Bobby Girard)

§  11 am-3 pm  Concessions

§  2 pm  Awards Ceremony

Indian Motocycle Day is the continuation of a long-standing tradition honoring the classic motorcycles that were developed and manufactured in Springfield from 1901 to 1953. The event was held from 1980-2005 at the Indian Motocycle Museum on Hendee Street in Springfield, which was owned by Charlie and Esta Manthos. In 2007, Esta Manthos donated their extensive collection of Indian Motocycles, artifacts and memorabilia to the Springfield Museums where it is now on view in the Wood Museum of Springfield History. The Museums re-established the Indian Motocycle Day tradition in 2010.

Indian Motocycle Collection — View the collection in the air-conditioned Wood Museum of Springfield History, including the exhibit Charles Manthos and His Indian Prototype.

All ticketed Indian Motocycle Day guests are also eligible for admittance to the history museum where they can view the Indian Motocyle Collection. Among the rarest Indians on view is the single cylinder Indian designed and owned by Indian co-founder Oscar Hedstrom. When he left the company, he took this motorcycle with him, and it was later passed on to his daughter. Also featured are Indian racer and dealer Stanley Cornell’s unique 1912 board track cycle with its original shipping crate; an entirely restored, operable 1929 101 Scout; and a 1927 hill-climber.

The collection also includes artifacts, memorabilia, and photographs highlighting production of Indian’s civilian and military motorcycles from the early years at the famous Wigwam through the final days of the company in 1953.

Visitors can also see Charles Manthos and his Prototype Indian Motocycle. The late Charlie Manthos, a professional metallurgist and ardent Indian Motocycle collector, had an entrepreneurial vision of bringing a new, locally manufactured Indian Motocycle back into production. Working with two former Indian employees, Earl “Pop” Armstrong and design engineer Jimmie Hill, he created a prototype based on the 1953 Indian Chief, the last of the original Indian production line. He hoped to take it to market in 1975 but his dream was never realized.

Indian Motocycle Day: $10 for adults,$5 for children ages 3-17. Free with paid admission to the Springfield Museums. The fee also includes admission also to the Wood Museum of Springfield History. Anyone bringing a pre-1953 Indian for exhibition will receive one free adult admission plus a commemorative Indian Day button.

For information, call 413.263.6800, ext. 304, or visit http://www.springfieldmuseums.org

27 July — History Camp Pioneer Valley
Pioneer Valley History Network
at Kittredge Center, Holyoke Community College, 9 am – 4 pm

This will be a gathering of history enthusiasts of all ages for a day of learning and sharing. This is PVHN’s 4th annual History Camp Pioneer Valley, based on the “un-conference” model developed by History Camp Boston. What is an “un-conference”? In short, it’s a self-organizing conference. People who share a common interest get together and create the framework for the event:

* The topics that are presented are the ones of interest to the presenters.
* Anyone can present. No committee will “screen” the topics and requesting a time-slot is easy.
* The sessions that are well-attended are the ones that are of interest to the attendees.
* It’s an incredibly democratic way to gather and share information.

The cost is low — the goal is to break even. There are no paid staff, no paid speakers, and no one will profit. We want your participation. There will also be plenty of opportunity for networking and an exhibit area for selling books and other history-related products.

There is no specific theme, but please, no political diatribes or sales pitches for  commercial products or services. Other than that, the sky is the limit.

To Register to Attend or Present, go to: http://historycamp.org/pioneer-valley
For more Information, contact us at: pioneervalleyhistory@gmail.com

27 July — “A Summer Day on the Buckland Common”
Buckland Historical Society
Buckland Common, corners of Upper and Cross Sts., Buckland Center

Fifth Annual “A Summer Day on the Buckland Common”, 10 am to 3 pm on the historic Buckland Common at the corners of Upper and Cross Streets in Buckland Center MA and at venues all along Upper St.

Held Rain or Shine, Free Admission, Free Parking. Activities for the whole family:

Fire Dept, Snowmobile Club, Cyndie Fisher Mosaics at noon,

Kids Market, Kids Crafts, book and tag sales, raffles, tours and demonstrations, textile display, lots of vendors of various arts and crafts, Shelburne Falls Military Band Concert at 1:30 pm,

Historical Museum open with blueberry buckle,

Robert Strong Woodward art studio open 10:30 am to 3 pm at 43 Upper St.,

Chicken BBQ at 12:30 pm, or purchase hamburgers or hot dogs for lighter lunch. lots more!

Hosted by the Mary Lyon Church, the Buckland Historical Society, the Buckland
Union Cemetery Association, and the Buckland Public Library.

For more information about “A Summer Day on the Buckland Common,” email
Laurie at lmbenoit@outlook.com

23 July — “Get the Dish on Chowder History”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6-8 pm

On Tuesday, July 23 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, Wistariahurst will host “Get the Dish on Chowder History.” Join us as food writer and chowder connoisseur Robert S. Cox dishes out the history, flavors and significance of every New Englander’s favorite comfort food. Smithsonian Café and Chowder House of Hatfield, MA will be serving up a tasty chowder tribute to enjoy while learning the history of this flavorful dish. Enjoy an old-time picnic atmosphere while learning and tasting history.

New England’s culinary history is marked by a varying array of chowders. Early forms were thick and layered, but the adaptability of this beloved recipe has allowed for a multitude of tasty preparations to emerge. Thick or thin, brimming with fish or clams or corn, chowder springs up throughout the region in as many distinctive varieties as there are ports of call. It remains the quintessential expression of New England cuisine.

This event is part of the Wistariahurst Historical Lecture Series People, Places, Food, & Sport. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be held in the Music Room.

Advanced registration is required. Tickets are $15. Tickets for Wistariahurst Museum members are $12. Admission includes a cup of chowder, a roll, and a cookie. Tickets can be purchased at http://www.Wistariahurst.org.

20 & 21 July — “Blast Into the Past”
William Cullen Bryant Homestead, 207 Bryant Rd., Cummington, 10 am – 4 pm

Live a Day in 1805 at the William C. Bryant Homestead.

Come celebrate the story of western Massachusetts — our home. Join a vibrant hilltown community and experience life in the early 1800s, with tinning, craft-making, open fire cooking, and more.

Members: $11 Adults/ $7 Youth
Non-Members: $18 Adults/ $12 Youth

20 July — Ice Cream Social
Historical Society of Greenfield
43 Church St., Greenfield, noon – 2 pm

You are invited to a Party! Birthday Celebration & Ice Cream Social! Snow’s Ice Cream.

18 July — Opening Reception for “Stitch By Stitch”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

On Thursday, July 18 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm, Wistariahurst will host an Opening Reception for “Stitch by Stitch: Needlework from the Wistariahurst Collection,” guest curated by Joanne Picard. The Opening Reception is free and open to the public.

Stitch by Stitch features selections from Wistariahurst’s textile collection, including samplers from what are now the United States and the United Kingdom. These samplers date from approximately 1690 through 1850 and reflect a range of styles. The exhibit will illustrate components, look at who made samplers, and discuss how they were made and why. It will examine how sampler designs and motifs reflected the lives and beliefs of their makers and provide visitors with an opportunity to try their hand at cross stitch and other patterns.

Stitch by Stitch will be on display from Thursday, July 18 through Sunday, August 18. The exhibit will be open to the public during Wistariahurst’s self-guided tour open hours, Sunday – Wednesday from 12:00 – 4:00 pm. A suggested donation of $3 is encouraged.

Joanne Picard has been studying and reproducing historic samplers for more than 30 years.  She was initially attracted to them by the variations in alphabet styles, the range of colors (though now often faded), and the questions they raised about the identities and lives of their makers.  Reproducing a historic sampler requires a close examination of the original pattern that often illuminates details of design and construction that might otherwise be overlooked.  It also requires an attention to detail that one imagines some girls found boring and repetitive, and others, including Joanne, found rewarding and relaxing.  Joanne has demonstrated needlework at several historic house museums, and she has been a volunteer in the curatorial department at Naumkeag in Stockbridge.  She is currently a volunteer in the Wistariahurst archives.

17 July — “Exploring Northampton — Nature in Northampton: A Walking Tour with Laurie Sanders”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 12 – 1 pm

Join Laurie Sanders to look for every plant or animal species that survives in downtown, from the mosses and ants living in the cracks and margins to the larger plants and creatures that are able to survive in the wilder and untended pockets that occur in and around the heart of the city. Pre-registration is required.

$5 members and donors
$8 all others

13 July — “Exploring Northampton — 350 Years in 90 Minutes: A Walking Tour of Downtown Northampton”
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 8:30 – 10 am

Elizabeth Sharpe, co-director of Historic Northampton and historian, will lead a walking tour of downtown Northampton in conjunction with the exhibit, Making it on Main Street. Pre-registration is required.

$8 members and donors
$12 all others

13 July — Local Music, Local History: Tim Eriksen
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 7 – 9 pm

Join Tim Eriksen and friends for an evening of acoustic music featuring songs with local connections and history.

Tim Eriksen has been performing in the Northampton area for over thirty years, beginning with his band Cordelia’s Dad. Over the years he has amassed a large repertoire of music with local origin and resonance which culminated in a 2015 Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University.

Drawing on materials discovered in Historic Northampton’s collection, local junk shops, church basements and old newspapers, the performance will include murder ballads, fiddle tunes, shape-note harmony and haunting originals about time, place, identity and mystery. Every song has a story, some of which are fictional, and some of which are stranger than fiction.

On the Grounds of Historic Northampton. Bring a chair or a blanket & listen to live music. The lawn opens at 6 pm for picnicking.  Music 7 – 9. Free & open to the public.

Little Truc food truck will be on site, selling creative southeast Asian food.

In case of rain the concert will be held at First Churches sanctuary at 129 Main Street, Northampton.

13 July — Celebrate Big Band Music with Simply Swing
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, One Armory Way, Springfield, 6:30 – 8 pm

Bring a lawn chair, picnic supper and your dance shoes and join us outside on our historic grounds for our annual Big Band concert featuring Simply Swing on Saturday, July 13. Dance lessons begin at 5:30 pm and the concert from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. Admission is free.

Simply Swing features a swinging horn section, a dynamic rhythm section and wonderful vocals by Vivian LaRosa. Under the musical direction of drummer/composer/arranger Joe LaRosa,  Simply Swing specializes in recreating the music and memories of the Big Band and Swing eras.

“We are thrilled to be performing at the Springfield Armory on July 13, commemorating the Benny Goodman Orchestra’s 1943 concert at this historic landmark that played such a crucial role during WWII,” said Joe LaRosa.

Simply Swing’s cadre of talented musicians features veterans with more than 100 years of combined service in U.S. military bands. For this performance, Simply Swing has planned a number of favorites from the Benny Goodman library featuring Dan O’Brian on clarinet. Dan is a Ph.D. candidate at the New England Conservatory.

Park Ranger Susan Ashman, explained the historical connection between Springfield Armory NHS and Big Band music.

“In 1943 Benny Goodman and his band came to the Armory as part of his nationwide Twilight Tours. Goodman made a point to play to war workers like those at the Springfield Armory as a thank you for their dedication and patriotism. The Armory workers were essential in the manufacturing of firearms for the military during WWII.”

10 July — Tour of Historic Graveyards in Pelham
Pelham Historical Society
meet at North Valley Cemetery, Pelham, 2 pm

Rain Date: Sunday, July 14 at 2 p.m.

Visit to the North Valley and Cook – Johnson Cemeteries

Cemetery Commissioners Cleon Booth, Norman Page and several Pelham History Society Board members will share brief histories, stories and points of interest relating to two of Pelham’s burying grounds: the North Valley Cemetery and the Cook-Johnson Cemetery.  As we tour those cemeteries we will encounter some of the decorative stone engravings, personal inscriptions and fables that have endured the test of time.  For more information contact Bruce Klotz, 413-253-1601  or Linda Campbell Hanscom, 413-323-7377.

7 July — “A Servant’s Perspective Tour: Chauffeur Charlie Linderme”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 1 & 3 pm

On Sunday, July 7 at 1:00 and 3:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host A Servant’s Perspective Tour: Chauffeur Charlie Linderme, a guided tour of Wistariahurst Museum.

At its peak, 32 servants and support staff kept Wistariahurst running. On this specialty tour, hear from one of them as a Wistariahurst docent offers a guided tour in character as chauffeur Charles Linderme. Listen as Charlie recalls his time attending to the woman he affectionately called “the Chief,” Katharine Kilborne, Wistariahurst’s last Skinner resident. Learn about the behind-the-scenes workings of the Skinner Estate.

Advance ticket purchase is encouraged. Tickets can be purchased online at http://www.Wistariahurst.org. Tickets are $10 and $7 for students, seniors, and Wistariahurst Museum members.

7 July — Old-Fashioned Ice Cream Social & 20th Anniversary Gala
Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd., Monson, 1 – 3:30 pm

The Keep Homestead Museum’s annual Ice Cream social is a Birthday Party this year! Help us celebrate 20 years of being your museum. We’ll have cake, balloons, and maybe a door prize or two! Straw hats and sunbonnets welcome!!

Come one, come all!

Come spend a summer afternoon. Create your own sundae, and tour the air-conditioned museum that has one of the largest button collections in the US and furnished with period furniture and items that belonged to the Keep family who lived there for over 150 years. The museum will be open for the afternoon. Hike the trails or stroll through the gardens and admire the Alan Robert Phillips sculptures.

The Social will be held rain or shine – it can move into the barn. There is no charge for this event, but donations will be accepted. For more information, call 413-267-4137, email at khm@keephomesteadmuseum.org or visit the web: http://www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

6 July — “A Perfect Spot of Tea”
Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, 130 River Dr., Hadley, 2:30 & 3:30 pm

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum kicks off its 2019 series of  “A PERFECT SPOT OF TEA” on Saturday, July 6th with a performance by Andrew Jenkins. The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum invites guests to partake in its 250 year old tradition of afternoon tea with good company, interesting conversation, and lively music. Admission is $12 per person. There are seatings at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum. Tours are hourly beginning at 1:30 pm.

During tea on Saturday, July 6th, Andrew Jenkins will perform his original jazz pieces and jazz adaptations of Bach, as well as “modal meditations” suited to the atmosphere of the museum. Formerly of the New York area, Jenkins studied music and guitar at Berklee College in the 1980’s. As a long-term Pioneer Valley resident, Jenkins has become a regular performer in the area. In addition, he hosts and produces the local TV access show Thoughts and Sounds from New England.

Elizabeth Porter Phelps, a resident of the house from its construction in 1752, regularly hosted teas until her death in 1817, and noted the teas often attracted ten to fifteen couples weekly. Elizabeth’s daughter met her future husband, Dan Huntington, at one of these events. Visitors would “tarry” a while over a beverage that “cheers but not inebriates.”

The series is made possible through generous donations from area musicians, volunteer servers, restaurants, grocers, florists, and other businesses who provide the music, engagement, tea, pastries, and flowers for this program.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47. The Museum is open for guided tours Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The house, which remains unchanged since the family’s occupancy, tells the story of six generations of prominent Hadley residents. The family, prosperous traders turned farmers, fought in both the French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars, rose to prominence in local government, and embodied a consistently progressive social consciousness. Tours highlight both local and regional narratives, from architecture, material culture, and labor, to early-American theology, economics, women’s history and social movements. For further information about tours or other programs, please call the Museum at (413) 584-4699 or visit our website at http://www.pphmuseum.org .

4 July — 4th Annual Fourth of July Community Reading
Shaw Memorial Library, Plainfield, MA, 10 am – noon

Want to do something constructive in our community? Join the Fourth of July community reading and discussion on July 4. We’ll read the Declaration of Independence and abolitionist Frederick Douglass’ 1852 Fourth of July address, in which he asks whether the country is living up to its ideals.

This is our fourth annual reading. In part it is a ceremony in which we remind ourselves of what we’re up to as a country. In part it is a way to have a constructive dialogue with others in our community. We are happy to let you know that my former colleague, Rose Sackey-Milligan, will be joining us  in moderating so we can split onto groups for discussion — which is easier than 60 people trying to talk to each other!

10-noon under the pavilion behind the library. It looks like it will be dry— in the unlikely event of rain, we’ll do it at the Town Hall.

This event is for all age 12 and over. Reading and discussion will be interpreted by ASL interpreter Joan Wattman. This event is  hosted by the Shaw Memorial Library, and co-hosted by Earthdance and the Plainfield Historical Society.  It is funded in part by Mass Humanities and by the Plainfield Cultural Council — which is funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

Looking forward to seeing you there! Pass the word, would you?

for the Shaw Memorial Library and Plainfield Reads,
Eric Burcroff and Pleun Bouricius

2 July — “Exploring Northampton — From Northampton to the Boundary Waters (or at least the boundary with Hatfield)
Historic Northampton, 46 Bridge St., Northampton, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

Take in the beauty of the Connecticut River in a dragon boat. Paddle with Paradise City Dragon Boat and Historic Northampton from the site of the former New Haven-Northampton canal to the Hatfield boundary and learn about our rich natural and cultural history at the same time.

This is an active outing for ages 18+. Pre-registration is required.

$25 members and donors of Historic Northampton
$35 all others

JUNE 2019

27 June 2019 – “Orra White Hitchcock”
Plainfield Historical Society
at Shaw Memorial Library, 312 Main St, Plainfield, 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm

As part of the continuing exhibit of the Plainfield Historical Society’s Plants on Paper: Two Centuries of
Collecting, Studying and the Art of the Flora of Plainfield, Massachusetts, please join us this Thursday, June 27, 2019 from 6:30 pm to 7:45 pm at the Shaw Memorial Library for presentation on Orra White Hitchcock (March 8, 1796 – May 26, 1863) by Reba- Jean Shaw Pichette, curator of the Shelbourne
Historical Society. Ms. Pichette brings to life the little-known art of one of the Connecticut River Valley’s
earliest female artists and a leading scientific illustrator of her time, Orra White Hitchcock. Orra White
Hitchcock and her husband Edward, (May 24, 1793 – February 27, 1864) an American geologist and the
third President of Amherst College, collected and dried a variety of grasses and wildflowers from our region, influencing many of the botanists of the time, including Plainfield’s own Jacob Porter and members of the Shaw family.

From 1817-1821, Orra created 63 watercolor images of their collection and compiled them into a book called Herbarium parvum pictum. Shaw-Pichette, a museum educator at the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, for National Park Services and for the Veteran’s Education Project, has worked in this field
for more than 20 years. Ms. Shaw-Pinchette will take on the persona of Orra White Hitchcock and invite us all to step into her life. Guests will also try their hand at botanical illustrations. This event is free but donations to the Plainfield Historical Society are deeply appreciated.

Place: Shaw Memorial Library, 312 Main St, Plainfield, MA 01070 Date: Thursday,
June 27, 2019 Time: 6:30 pm

24 June  — Mass. History Conference
Mass. History Alliance
Holy Cross College, Worcester, MA.

For more info, go to Mass. History Alliance (https://masshistoryalliance.org/)

22 June — 20th Annual Strawberry Social
Ramapogue Historical Society
Josiah Day House, 70 Park St., West Springfield, noon – 3 pm

The Ramapogue Historical Society would like to inform you of the upcoming event to be held at the Josiah Day House.

20th Annual Strawberry Social
Josiah Day House, 70 Park St., West Springfield, MA

  • Strawberry Shortcake
  • Tour of 1754 Brick Saltbox Museum
  • Special Display of Women’s 1800 Dresses & Accessories
  • Fiddle Music and Colonial Camp Songs
  • Reenactors Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage
  • Basket Weaving, Wool Spinning, Early American Crafts

$5.00 (12 years old and under $2.00; 5 years old and under free)

for more information call : 413-739-7453

21 June — “Program and Pie Social”
Buckland Historical Society
at the Buckland Public Hall, 15 Upper St., Buckland Center, 7 pm

The “52nd Massachusetts Regiment of Volunteers: Our Boys in the Civil War”.
David Parrella will be giving a Power Point presentation that traces the journey of Joseph Wilder and his companions during the 1863 Port Hudson Campaign in Louisiana.
Joseph Wilder grew up on the Wilder Homestead in Buckland.

The Program is followed by a Pie Social.
Admission $6.00 / Students 12 & under $3.00

Polly Anderson 1-413-625-9763

20 June — “50 Year Anniversary: First Men on the Moon”
Museums a La Carte Lecture Series
Davis Auditorium, Springfield Museums, Springfield, 12:15 pm

It has been called one of the most significant events in the history of mankind. Why was it important for the US to be the first nation to put men on the moon? Who were the key individuals in realizing this goal? How did it happen, and where do we go from here?

Presented by Richard J. Pinkos, former history teacher.

The audience is invited to bring a lunch to enjoy during the program.

Tickets available first-come, first-serve on the day of the lecture at the Welcome Center. The audience is invited to bring a lunch to enjoy during the program. Free coffee available. Cookies provided courtesy of Big Y.

15 June — Disaster Planning Workshop
Pioneer Valley History Network
Deerfield Community Center, 16 Memorial St., Historic Deerfield

You asked for it!
DISASTER PLANNING 101:
Come learn how to start (or finish) that disaster plan, identify highest risks in your museum or historic house and know what steps to take if disaster strikes. Plus, a chance to win loot for your institution!

Half-day workshop by Evan Knight, Preservation Specialist at MBLC (Mass. Board of Library Commissioners). This workshop will help you:
1) Think like an actuary: What are your areas of greatest risk? How to mitigate those disaster risks one step at a time. And how does emergency response planning fit into building a comprehensive
collections management plan?
2) Know what to do in a water emergency: Since water emergencies are typically among the most common, you’ll learn what to do immediately in case of water damage, including basic salvage tips for books, photos and documents.
3) Walk away with disaster planning templates and worksheets you can customize to your facility so you know where to start!

Cost: $15 for organization (1 to 4 people)
Coffee, tea, water and light snacks provided.
**Registration includes chances to win free supplies from University Products and one of two $50 gift certificates from Gaylord Archival!**

Please R.S.V.P. Pay at the door OR visit the PVHN site and click the “Donate” button on the right.
(https://pioneervalleyhistorynetwork.org )

15 June — Community Day for Belchertown, Granby & South Hadley
Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum
130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, 10 am – 3:30 pm

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Belchertown, South Hadley, and Granby to a Community Day on Sunday, June 15th, 2019 from 10 am to 3:30 pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterward, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.

This summer, Belchertown native, Belchertown High School alumna, and Smith College student, Lily Stowe-Alekman will be working as a Museum Assistant. As a history major with an archives concentration focused on American and women’s history, Stowe-Alekman is especially interested by the stories of the women in the family, slavery and indentured servitude on the homestead, and the transformation of the house into a museum. “Working in a historical site every day is an incredibly powerful and transformative experience,” Stowe-Alekman states. As a local, connecting with the history of the Connecticut River Valley has been especially important. As is tradition for Museum Assistants at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, Stowe-Alekman has written her own tour based on her interests as a history major. She hopes to see many familiar faces at this Community Day!

15 June 2019 — “Botanical Painting”
Plainfield Historical Society
at Shaw Memorial Library, Plainfield, 9:30 am – 11:30 pm

with local artist, Beverly Duncan  Open fundraising event.

13 June — Untold Story of the Cuban Missile Crisis
Museums a La Carte Lecture Series
Davis Auditorium, Springfield Museums, Springfield, 12:15 pm

In this multimedia presentation based on his newly published co-authored book Above & Beyond: John F. Kennedy and America’s Most Dangerous Cold War Spy Mission, New York Times bestselling author Michael J. Tougias first chronicles the thirteen harrowing days of the Cuban Missile Crisis and then outlines the steps President Kennedy made to reach a decision on a course of action. Special emphasis is given to the heroes of the crisis: the U-2 pilots who flew unarmed missions over Cuba. Most people don’t realize one of our pilots was shot down and killed over Cuba, almost leading to the start of WWIII. Tougias will show slides of the events and discuss four lesser known incidents that put the world in peril.

Presented by Michael J. Tougias, author

The audience is invited to bring a lunch to enjoy during the program.

Tickets available first-come, first-serve on the day of the lecture at the Welcome Center. The audience is invited to bring a lunch to enjoy during the program. Free coffee available. Cookies provided courtesy of Big Y.

9 June — Community Day for Northampton, Hatfield & Whately
Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum
130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, 10 am – 3:30 pm

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Northampton, Hatfield, and Whately to a Community Day on Sunday, June 9th, 2019 from 10 am to 3:30 pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.

9 June — Holyoke League of Arts and Crafts Annual Exhibition Opening
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 2 – 4 pm

On Sunday, June 9, 2019 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host the Opening Reception for the Holyoke League of Arts and Crafts’s 2019 Annual Exhibition. The Opening Reception is free and open to the public.

This June, the Gallery at Wistariahurst will host an exhibition of artwork by members of The Holyoke League of Arts and Crafts. This juried show will include entries in oil and pastel, watercolor, acrylic, tempera, gouache and other non-oil wet media, graphite, charcoal, printmaking and other graphic media, sculpture and ceramics.

The exhibition may be viewed during the museum’s open hours: Sunday – Wednesday, 12 pm – 4 pm. The show will close on Wednesday, June 26. Visits to the gallery include a self-guided tour for a suggested donation of $3.

Organized in 1923 to promote the arts in the community, the Holyoke League of Arts and Crafts holds monthly meetings to conduct artist demonstrations, critiques, and group art activities.

8 June — “The Partitions of Poland, or, How a Major European State Was Wiped Off the Map of Europe”
Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts
at the Chicopee Public Library, 449 Front St., Chicopee, 1 – 3 pm

Poland has had a rocky, if fascinating, history. In its incarnation as the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the country was once the largest in continental Europe. Yet, by the end of the eighteenth century, it had disappeared from the map of Europe. In this lecture Dr. Patrice Dabrowski will detail the country’s step-by-step dismemberment by its neighbors Prussia, Russia, and Austria as well as the Polish reaction to the partitions. It is a tale of decline but also determination. Under conditions that would daunt any country, Poles managed to enact Europe’s first constitution. Nor did they go down without a fight, as the efforts of a favorite son of Poland and America, Tadeusz (Thaddeus) Kościuszko, attest. Dr. Dabrowski will also consider the important repercussions the partitions had for the Polish nation.

About the speaker — Patrice M. Dabrowski is a historian with degrees from Harvard University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and recently finished a three-year stint at the University of Vienna. Dr. Dabrowski is currently an Associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. In addition to having held a number of grants and postdoctoral fellowships, she has also won awards for several scholarly articles. Dabrowski is the author of two books: Poland: The First Thousand Years and Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland. In 2014 she was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. In the fall of 2019 she will once again teach her popular “One Thousand Years of Polish History” course at UMass Amherst.

Free – bring a friend. Refreshments served after the presentation. Stay to mix and chat.

8 June — Community Day for Amherst, Hadley & Sunderland
Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum
130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, 10 am – 3:30 pm

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Amherst, Hadley, and Sunderland to a Community Day on Saturday, June 8th, 2019 from 10 am to 3:30 pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterward, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.

8 June — “Flowers, Then and Now”
Plainfield Historical Society
at the Plainfield Library, Plainfield, 10 am

TALK re: flowers then and now 10 am Saturday library PLUS see the exhibit, “Plants on Paper.” Pam Weatherby, author of Flora of the Berkshires, will talk about  flowers in the 1854 herbarium —  then and now.

The exhibit will be up until July 31. For more information see our facebook listing, or be in touch with Judy Williams 634-8099.

4 June — “The Civilian Conservation Corps in Western Massachusetts”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 6 pm

On Tuesday, June 4, 2019 from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host a lecture entitled “The Civilian Conservation Corps in Western Massachusetts” as part of the new Wistariahurst Historical Lecture Series, People, Places, Food, & Sport. The lecture will be presented by DCR Regional Educator, Gini Traub.

The Civilian Conservation Corps was born of a converging environmental and economic crisis in the 1930’s. It left a lasting legacy. Witness the conditions that led to the CCC’s formation. Learn about the “boys” who enrolled in the program, their everyday life in the camps, and their work projects at Massachusetts State Forests and Parks. This story is told through historic images, old documents, quotations, and oral histories.

A donation of $5 is suggested.

ABOUT WISTARIAHURST
Wistariahurst is an educational and cultural center owned and operated by the City of Holyoke and supported by Historic Holyoke at Wistariahurst. Wistariahurst is dedicated to preserving Holyoke’s history and inspiring an appreciation of history and culture through educational programs, exhibits and special events. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Wistariahurst is the former home of William Skinner, a prominent silk manufacturer and was built in 1874.

Today, Wistariahurst offers a wide variety of public programs and events including: workshops, concerts, lectures and demonstrations and serves the community through educational programs, community partnerships, history projects, and outreach activities. More information is available at http://www.Wistariahurst.org

2 June — “Pelham Historical Complex”
Pelham Historical Society
meet at Pelham Town Hall

Museum Opening Events:

1:30 PM – Tour of Town Complex

3:00 PM – Connie Kindahl – Weavings and Garden Tour (Meet at Town Hall)

Visit the Pelham Historical Society’s Museum on its Opening Day to find out what’s new.  Learn about our small town with its big history by enjoying a tour of the Town Complex at 1:30 p.m. with our local historian Joseph Larson.  Join us at the Town Hall at 3:00 p.m. to view some of long-time Pelham resident Connie Kindahl’s weavings followed by a tour of her beautiful gardens.  For more information contact

Cynthia Weigel, 413-256-4606.

2 June — “Return of the Raptors”
Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd., Monson, 1:30 pm

with Tom Ricardi of the Birds of Prey Rehabilitation Center at the Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd., Monson, MA on Sunday, June 2 at 1:30 pm.

Ricardi has operated the Birds of Prey Rehabilitation Center in Conway, MA since 1970; however his interest in birds of prey began as a small child. He currently has approximately 60 birds in the Center – some too injured to release into the wild. Many of these are used in breeding programs and to date bald eagles, kestrels, barn owls and red-tailed hawks have been bred. He will bring several of the birds to visit, including a golden eagle.

The Keep Homestead Museum will be open 1:00-3:3:30 pm on that day. There is no admission charge and refreshments will be served. The program will be on the lawn, so bring a lawn chair or blanket. In case of rain, the program will move into the barn.

For more information, call 413-267-4137, email info@keephomesteadmuseum.org or look on the web at www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

1 June — “Plants on Paper” Opening
Plainfield Historical Society
at the Shaw Memorial Library, Plainfield, 9:30 – noon

The Plainfield Historical Society was given a fantastic 1854 herbarium (book with dried flowers) and we built an exhibit around it.

Join us for the festive opening on Saturday June 1, 9:30 am-12:00 pm, including a formal opening at 10:00 am followed by a nature walk with Nan Childs (rain or shine). Flower-themed refreshments will be served.

The exhibit will be up until July 31. For more information see our facebook listing, or be in touch with Judy Williams 634-8099 or Pleun Clara Bouricius, PhD: pleunbouricius@gmail.com

MAY 2019

26 May — Memorial Day Observance
Pelham Historical Society

Quabbin Park Cemetery, Route 9, Belchertown, 10 am

Meet at 10 a.m. at the Quabbin Park Cemetery in Belchertown for refreshments followed by a parade and service at 11 a.m., honoring individuals removed from their original resting places for the building of the Quabbin Reservoir.

March behind the Pelham Historical Society banner with Pelham residents.

For more information contact
Ginia Servos, 413-253-9934.

26 May — “Through Marian’s Eyes: A Red Cross Canteen Worker Recounts World War I”
Hatfield Historical Society
at the Hatfield Historical Museum, 39 Main St., Hatfield (2nd floor of library)

Come to the opening of our new exhibit in the Hatfield Historical Museum:
“Through Marian’s Eyes: A Red Cross Canteen Worker Recounts World War I”
Opening Sunday, May 26.

11 am to 12 noon (before Hatfield’s Memorial Day Parade)
and 1:30 to 3:30 pm (after Memorial Day Ceremony at Town Hall)

Our opening day activities will include a Remembrance Board to pin up a poppy with your WWI veteran’s info, and our version of a Red Cross Canteen tent, staffed by costumed canteen workers serving coffee, donuts and chocolate. Don’t miss it!

For more info:
https://hatfieldhistory.weebly.com/events.html

Exhibit curated and presented by the Hatfield Historical Society and co-sponsored by the Forbes Library, which is presenting an online exhibit showcasing WWI soldiers from Hampshire County, including Hatfield.

This exhibit is also supported by a grant from the Pioneer Valley History Network, with funding from the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts and Mass Humanities. Thank you to all our sponsors!

25 May — “Shades of Gray” Concert
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, 1 Armory Square, Springfield, 2 pm

Back by request! Experience the music of the Civil War while remembering the sacrifice of thousands of Union and Confederate Soldiers. Concert will take place inside the Armory museum on Saturday, May 25 at 2:00 – 3:30 pm. Admission is free.

“Music was an integral part of a soldier’s life. They spent the majority of their time in camp and music helped to pass the time. It reminded them of home and family and strengthened the bonds of camaraderie and friendship. More music and song was created during the Civil War than all the other wars combined,” remarked Park Ranger Susan Ashman.

Shades of Gray is a Civil War era camp band composed of 6 members mostly made up of reenactors. They have performed all over New England, including the State House and historic Gettysburg. Sing-a-long with rousing patriotic songs such as “Oh Susanna”, “Camp Town Races, and “Bonnie Blue Flag”. While some songs express humor, other songs tell emotional stories of a time when men were pitted against both foes and family for causes they believed were right for them.

The band got its start as a group of Confederate Civil War reenactors. “Shades of Gray had its beginnings as most camp bands of the era would have, with soldiers coming together around the camp fire to swap stories and sing songs”, comments band member Larry Todd.

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of the nation’s first armory, established in 1794. As a unit of the National Park Service, the Museum is currently open Wednesday-Sunday, from 9:00am to 5:00pm. We are closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check the website at http://www.nps.gov/spar or http://www.facebook.com/sparnhs

Susan Ashman
Park Ranger
Historic Weapons Supervisor
——————————————–
Springfield Armory National Historic Site
One Armory Square, Suite 2
Springfield, MA 01105-1299
Ph: (413) 734-8551 ext 233
Fax: (413) 747-8062
Susan_Ashman@nps.gov

23 May — “Exploring Northampton Series: Big Trees of Look Park”
Historic Northampton
at Look Park, Northampton, 10 am – 1 pm

Noted big tree hunter and expert Bob Leverett will lead participants on a 3-hour guided walk of notable trees found in and around Look Park. In addition to pointing out individual trees, Bob will share information about the species’ life history and ecology and also include information about the park’s history and earlier uses.

Pre-registration is required. Registration limited to 20.
$8 members and donors
$12 non-members

23 May — “Stone Prayers”
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, 7-9 pm

This presentation features guest speaker Dr. Curtiss Hoffman, professor emeritus at Bridgewater State University, who has just released his book, Stone Prayers: Native Constructions of the Eastern Seaboard.

22 May — “A History of Golf in Holyoke”
Holyoke Public Library Community Room, 6:30 – 7:30 pm

The late 19th and early 20th centuries brought not only industry and prosperity to Holyoke, but a demand for physical, athletic, and social activities for its people.  The introduction of the sport of golf at the turn of the 20th century appealed to the mill owners and businessmen as well as the workers.  Tom Kass’s talk will explore the origins of three of Holyoke’s golf courses and the colorful personalities involved in golf in Holyoke through the years.

Tom is a licensed forester in Massachusetts and has been playing golf for almost 50 years.  He has been a member at two of Holyoke’s courses and has given presentations on other aspects of life in Holyoke, past and present.

Sponsored by the Holyoke History Room.  Free and open to the public.  (413) 420-8107

21 May — “Tools for Dealing with Distressed Historic Properties”
Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, 60 Congress St., Springfield, 10 am – noon

In this workshop, Chris Skelly, the Director of Local Government Programs at the Massachusetts Historical Commission will provide a Statewide Overview of Minimum Maintenance Bylaws and Ordinances, Amber Villa from the Office of the Attorney General will speak about their Abandoned Housing Initiative and Damian Cote, the Holyoke Building Commissioner will discuss efforts to address blighted and vacant buildings in Holyoke. For more information and to register, visit:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tools-for-dealing-with-distressed-historic-properties-tickets-57833493536.

If you have any problems registering, please let me know.

Christopher C. Skelly
Director of Local Government Programs
Massachusetts Historical Commission
Christopher.Skelly@state.ma.us

18 May — Gardeners’ Annual Plant Sale
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 9 am – 1 pm

On Saturday, May 18 from 9am to 1pm, the Annual Plant Sale will return to Wistariahurst! Stock up on all your favorite perennials and annuals, carefully cultivated by a team of volunteer gardeners. All proceeds go towards the ongoing care and maintenance of the historically-inspired Wistariahurst grounds, as well as towards the Wistariahurst garden volunteer program. Please plan to arrive early as many plants sell out quickly.

ABOUT THE GARDENS — During the late 19th Century, the Skinner family transformed the grounds of Wistariahurst from an empty to lot to a lush landscape of trees and lawn. A variety of trees were planted on the grounds, including maple, peach, pear, and apple. In the 1880s, wisteria vines were planted along the base of the house becoming a hallmark of the home and giving the property its name. Today, the gardens are maintained by a group of over two dozen volunteer gardeners and are open to the public daily from dawn to dusk.

ABOUT WISTARIAHURST — Wistariahurst is an educational and cultural center owned and operated by the City of Holyoke and supported by Historic Holyoke at Wistariahurst. Wistariahurst is dedicated to preserving Holyoke’s history and inspiring an appreciation of history and culture through educational programs, exhibits and special events. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Wistariahurst is the former home of William Skinner, a prominent silk manufacturer and was built in 1874.

Today, Wistariahurst offers a wide variety of public programs and events including: workshops, concerts, lectures and demonstrations and serves the community through educational programs, community partnerships, history projects, and outreach activities. More information is available at www.Wistariahurst.org

18 May — Artist Reception: “Vital. Vibrant. Visible. Local Indigenous Identity Through Portraiture”
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, 10 am – 12 noon

Meet curator Rhonda Anderson, Iñupiaq – Athabaskan, and photographer Sara K. Lyons who worked together to reveal contemporary Indigenous community members through portraiture. “We are Vital. We are Vibrant. We are Visible,” writes Rhonda. “We are still here.” Images from Sara’s fine art photographic series have been exhibited in group shows throughout New England. Sara teaches art, photography, and design at a public charter school and Greenfield Community College.

18 May — “Annual Day of Remembrance: The 1676 Massacre of Natives at the Falls”
Nolumbeka Project
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, 1-3:30 pm

This commemoration sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project observes the 343rd anniversary of that tragedy. Meet in the Great Hall, rain or shine. Activities include a commemorative circle and sharing. Members of the Tribal and non-Tribal public are welcome. Open to all.

18 May — Opening Day: “Birding & History”
Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, 130 River Dr., Hadley

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, an historic house museum dating to 1752 in Hadley Massachusetts opens Saturday, May 18, 2019 for its 70th season. Guided tours will be available Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 to 4:30 pm. The museum is closed on Thursdays and Fridays. Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, known as Forty Acres, is an 18th-century farm on the banks of the Connecticut River that today interprets life in rural New England over three centuries.  Through the words, spaces and possessions of the women and men who lived here, the Museum portrays the activities of a prosperous and productive 18th-century farmstead. Members of this household along with numerous artisans, servants and slaves made “Forty Acres” an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national cultural and economic networks.  Through the 19th century the generations transformed the estate into a rural retreat. In the 20th-century the house was preserved as a museum by family members and now contains the possessions of six generations of this extended family.

Opening weekend, Saturday, May 18th a joint program with Kestrel Trust, Birding & History at Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will take place from 8 am – 11:30 am to celebrate both our Valley’s natural and cultural heritage and the Museum’s 70th anniversary. Moses Porter acquired 600 acres of land along the Connecticut River up to Mount Warner in North Hadley in 1752 to build the farmstead known as Forty Acres. The house sits in the Forty Acre Meadow along the Connecticut River two miles north of the Hadley Common.  The house, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is surrounded by over 350 acres of protected farmland, forest, and river frontage—including Kestrel’s Dyer Conservation Area donated by Elizabeth Huntington Dyer to the Nature Conservancy. The PPH Museum is also the Visitor Center for the National Connecticut River Scenic Byway. The cost for this special program is $15 per person. Registration is required. Contact Kestrel Trust to Register: https://www.kestreltrust.org/calendar/birding-history-pph-2019.

16 May — “Medicine in World War I — A Multi-Sensory Exploration!”
Hatfield Historical Society
at the Hatfield American Legion, 1 Prospect St., Hatfield, 6:30 pm

Come join us as living history educator Reba Jean Shaw-Pichette presents an interactive exploration of medicine during World War I. The program will include the 1918 influenza outbreak and its effects on the Valley as well as on WWI soldiers and Red Cross workers at home and abroad. Her presentation includes local historical documents, oral history, and period remedies. Come to be cured!

7:00 pm: Medicine in WWI Program.
Historical Society Members Free. Non-Members: $5
(Annual Historical Society Membership, Individual, $10)

Program follows 6:30 pm Historical Society Annual Meeting

Refreshments to follow program — ice cream with toppings.

This program is hosted by the Hatfield Historical Society and supported by a grant from the  the Pioneer Valley History Network, with funding from the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts and Mass Humanities. Thank you to all our sponsors!

For more details, go to: https://hatfieldhistory.weebly.com/events.html

14 May — “Firefighters of Northampton: Present Day Firefighting”
Historic Northampton
at Northampton Fire Station, 26 Carlon Drive off King St., 7 pm

What does Northampton Fire Rescue do? What do modern firefighters do? And how do they do it? Three Northampton firefighters – Tim McQuestion, Natalie Stollmeyer and Daryl Springman – will address these questions.

Local author and photographer Peter Norman will introduce his new book  Northampton Fire Rescue and show some of the photographs he took of the firefighters at work. This program is intended for adults.

12 May — “Mother’s Sweetheart Tea”
Shelburne Historical Society, 33 Severance St., Shelburne Falls, 1 – 4 pm

Free and open to the public. Spring hats and corsages are encouraged but optional. Bring your mother or grandmother, or special lady who has been a mentor, for an English-style cream tea! Sweet and savory snacks, including some from Alice Brown’s original recipe book for the Sweetheart Teahouse, will be served.

Live Harp music to be performed throughout the event by harpist Mona Seno from Northfield Mount Hermon and Berklee-trained harp instructor Piper Pichette. Be sure to see our new Milk & Tea exhibit while you are here!

Shelburne Historical Society, 33 Severence Street, Shelburne Falls, MA
(In the former Arms Academy building on the Corner of Maple and Church Streets)

Upcoming June Events at the museum include:
June 16, 1-4pm – Father’s Day, “How Does It Work?”
June 26, 7pm – Annual Outdoor Concert by the Shelburne Falls Military Band

Please consider volunteering at your local museum!

11 May — “The Land Shall Be Deluged In Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Springfield, 2 pm

Join Patrick Breen for his presenation, The Land Will Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt on Saturday, May 11 at 2:00 pm. Program will take place in the museum theater. Reservations are required due to limited seating. Admission is free of charge.

During his presentation, Mr. Breen will discuss America’s most famous and deadly slave revolt, one that in August of 1831 killed nearly five dozen whites in Southampton, Virginia. He will also discuss how this “new history” revises earlier understandings of slavery and slave resistance.

“I have long studied slavery, focusing especially on slavery in Virginia. It is an interest that first developed while attending college in Virginia, not terribly far from the scene of the revolt” comments Patrick Breen.

Patrick Breen is an associate professor of history & classics at Providence College in Rhode Island. His book, The Land Will Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt, will be available for purchase following the program.

The Springfield Armory National Historic Site is the location of the nation’s first armory (1794 – 1968) and was established by George Washington. The site includes historic grounds, buildings, and the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. There is ample parking and the building is wheelchair accessible. The Museum is currently open 9am – 5pm, Wednesday-Sunday. For further information call (413) 734-8551, check the website at www.nps.gov/spar  or go to:   www.facebook.com/sparnhs.

11 May — “Tapping Into History: Greenfield Tap & Die Expanded Exhibit”
Historical Society of Greenfield, 43 Church St., Greenfield, 3-6 pm

The history of Greenfield Tap & Die begins in the mid-1800s and continues to the current day! This expanded exhibit brings the recent history forward, following GTD through the changes over the past 30 years. Working in parallel with the Museum of Our Industrial Heritage, the Historical Society of Greenfield focuses on the community impact and social involvement of GTD from it’s beginnings as an endeavor of the Wells family, to employing more than the population of the town, through to the current position of Widia-GTD in the world market.

Come see items never before shown in a museum, including original wooden patterns for the “Little Giant” wrench, vintage posters, wooden screws, and an amazing example of a blacksmith’s hand-forged screw-plate.

The HSG at 43 Church St in Greenfield opens at noon on Saturday May 11th for the summer season. Visiting the museum is free, membership in the HSG is $20/year, and all donations go to help with every aspect of collections care.
hsgreenfield1907@gmail.com
413-774-3663
@HSgreenfieldMA

11 May — “Stories of Bicycling History & Activism”
Friends of Northampton Trails and Greenways & Historic Northampton
at 33 Hawley St., Northampton, 6 – 8 pm

A Public Talk by Lorenz J. Finison

Friends of Northampton Trails and Greenways and Historic Northampton invite you to a presentation by Lorenz Finison, author of Boston’s Twentieth-Century Bicycling Renaissance: Cultural Change on Two Wheels (UMass Press, 2019).

At the end of the nineteenth century, cycling’s popularity surged in the Boston area, but by 1900, the trend faded. Within the next few decades, automobiles became commonplace and roads were refashioned to serve them. Finison argues that bicycling witnessed a renaissance in the 1970s as concerns over physical and environmental health coalesced. Whether cyclists hit the roads on their way to work or to work out, went off-road in the mountains or to race via cyclocross and BMX, or took part in charity rides, biking was back in a major way.

Finison traces cycling history, chronicling the activities of environmental and social justice activists, stories of women breaking into male-dominated professions by becoming bike messengers and mechanics, and challenges faced by African American cyclists. He features topics of racing, touring, commuting, rails-to-trails, and how this history shapes our lives. This talk will introduce for the first time the Pedal Against Pollution of 1972 as it passed through Northampton and the ill-fated Tour de Trump stage race which rolled through Northampton in 1990.

Please RSVP to Deb@fntg.net to reserve your space. Please note: This email address is a .net domain.

Tickets will be purchased at 33 Hawley Street when you check in:
$8 for members of either FNTG or Historic Northampton
$12 for non-members

Lorenz J. Finison is a social psychologist, public health practitioner, historian, and cyclist. He is a founding member of Cycling Through History, a nonprofit organization that links cyclists with maps and information about African-American heritage and history in Massachusetts. Larry is the author of two books, Boston’s Cycle Craze, 1880-1900: A Story of Race, Class, and Society (2014) and Boston’s Twentieth-Century Bicycling Renaissance: Cultural Change on Two Wheels (2019). Autographed copies will be available for cash purchase at the talk.

11 May — Cemetery Workshop
New Salem Historical Commission
North New Salem Cemetery, Fay Rd., New Salem, 9 am – 3 pm

New Salem Historical Commission invites you to a Cemetery Workshop. Learn proper cleaning techniques and simple monument repairs. Wear work clothes.

CONTACT: Ta Mara Conde
978-575-1034 for more information

9 May — “At Sword’s Point: A Labor History of Franklin County”
Belding Memorial Library, Ashfield, MA, 7 pm

Western Massachusetts’ remarkable industrial history is matched by an equally remarkable history of organized labor. This untold story, pieced together using archival research, is presented with period images. The United Electrical Workers union was a good fit for workers until it was targeted by the Red Scare – turning the region into ground zero for a national struggle that lives with us to this day.

Tom Goldscheider is a labor historian based in Florence, MA. He earned a Masters in History at UMass Amherst and has published his work and given talks on them.

For more information:
Tom Goldscheider
tom.goldscheider@gmail.com

6 May — PVHN Spring Gathering & Annual Meeting,
at Deerfield Teachers Center, Memorial St., Deerfield, 6-9 pm.

This year’s theme is “1919”.

Presentations will include:
“Women’s Suffrage in the North Quabbin”Carla Charter will highlight the people, and the events that helped propel the movement forward, while also highlighting major milestones in other Pioneer Valley towns as well.
“Baseball’s Black Sox Scandal: Shoeless Joe Jackson, Buck Weaver, Arnold Rothstein, and a Nation Shocked” – with Tom Shea. Fans had their faith in the national pastime shaken when members of the Chicago White Sox were accused of deliberately trying to lose the 1919 World Series for a gambler’s payout. “Say it ain’t so, Joe.”
“1919 Ice Famine” – People don’t think of ice as a crop, but it was so very important by the beginning of the 20th century for food preservation and transportation. In 1919 there was a shortage – for reasons Dennis Picard will discuss — which led to some hard choices being made by Americans.
“Calvin Coolidge’s Governorship and the Boston Police Strike” – Northampton’s Calvin
Coolidge became Governor of Massachusetts in 1919. The post World War economy and fear led to widespread labor unrest. Julie Bartlett-Nelson will examine: What led the Boston Police to strike? What led Governor Coolidge to declare,“There is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, anytime”?

This PVHN event will be held on Monday evening, May 6th, from 6 – 9 pm. at the
Deerfield Teachers’ Center (behind Memorial Hall Museum) on Memorial St. in
Historic Deerfield. The cost of the event will be $15 ($10 for students), pay at the
door. Refreshments will be available. To help us prepare, please R.S.V.P. to Betsy at:
bmckee427@gmail.com

5 May — Opening Reception for “Perambulating Observations”
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, 2-4 pm

On Sunday, May 5, 2019, from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host an opening reception for their new art exhibit, Perambulating Observations. The reception is free and open to the public.

Perambulating Observations will be on view May 5 through May 31 at Wistariahurst. The exhibit will be available for drop-in visitors Sundays – Wednesdays, 12:00 – 4:00 p.m. The exhibit will have a delayed opening of 12:30 on May 20-22 and May 28-29. No open hours will be held on May 26 or 27. Admission is a $3 suggested donation and includes a self-guided tour of the first floor of the historic mansion.

Perambulating Observations features paintings by local artist, Frank Maginnis. “Conventional painting demands rules and disciplines. Abstract expressionism requires you to lose that control and allow your inner feelings to take over. These works demonstrate both,” states the artist.  For more information, please visit:  www.Wistariahurst.org or call 413-322-5560.

5 May — “Zoo On the Go”
Keep Homestead Museum, 35 Ely Rd., Monson, 1:30 pm

with Springfield’s Zoo at Forest Park

How does a reptile shed its skin? What does a porcupine use all those quills for? Why are parrots so good at singing? Learn the answers to these questions and more when the Zoo on the Go education program from the Zoo at Forest Park visits the Keep Homestead Museum. It’s a fun and educational way for children and adults to learn about a wide variety of mammals, reptiles, birds, amphibians, and arthropods. Let a knowledgeable and engaging staff member explore diets, habitats defenses, adaptations, daily zoo life, and more alongside some of the zoo animal inhabitants.

No admission charge. Refreshments served. Museum open 1:00-3:30 pm. For more information, call 413-267-4137, email khm@keephomesteadmuseum.org or visit www.keephomesteadmuseum.org

4 & 5 May — “Our Living Landscape!”
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Memorial Hall Museum, 8 Memorial St., Deerfield, 11 am – 4:30 pm

Memorial Hall Museum opens for the season with an ArtWeek celebration on May 4th & 5th!

Memorial Hall Museum opens for the season with the sights, sounds, and tastes of Our Living Landscape! As a proud ArtWeek host, the weekend includes FREE museum admission, art-making, tastings, and other sensory experiences.

Our beautiful river valley provides a wealth of inspiration for a FREE weekend of art-making, tastings, and other sensory experiences. Inside the museum galleries, make your own mini souvenir album with scenes from our early 20th-century postcard exhibit, emboss soft metal with landscape designs, and create nature-themed paper quilt squares. Outside, ongoing “drop in and stay a while” activities include wet-felting, collage and watercolor workshops inspired by landscapes, bird-call identification (led by the Great Falls Discovery Center), and tastings of local food and drink. Engage all your senses!

Admission to the museum’s 19 rooms of history, culture and fine art (including landscapes) and all special activities is offered FREE on Saturday and Sunday from 11 am to 2:30 pm (museum admission is also free until closing at 4:30 pm). For adults and school-age children. Outdoor workshops will be moved inside if inclement weather.  For more information, please visit: www.deerfield-ma.org.

3 May — Polish Constitution Day
Northampton Polish Heritage Committee
at St. Valentine’s Church, 127 King St., Northampton, 6 pm

Polish Constitution Day will be remembered Friday, May 3, 2019, beginning at 6 pm with the celebration of a bi-lingual Mass at St. Valentine’s Polish National Catholic Church. Following the Mass all are invited below for fellowship in the Community room where light refreshments will be served. Rev. Adam Czarnecki, Pastor will share information on the importance of the Polish Constitution noting similarities with the United States Constitution.

The current Constitution of the Republic of Poland was founded on April 2, 1997. It replaced the temporary amendments put into place in 1992 and was designed to reverse the effects of the Communist dictatorship which had been in place since the end of WWII. It was approved in a National Referendum on May 25, 1997 and became the law of the land on October 17, 1997.

The original Polish Constitution of May 3, 1791 sought to supplant the prevailing anarchy
fostered by some of the country’s magnates, with a more democratic constitutional monarchy. It introduced elements of political equality between townspeople and nobility, and placed peasants under the protection of the government mitigating the worst abuses of serfdom. The Polish Constitution of 1791 was the second such Constitution in the world following that adopted in the United States in 1789. All are encouraged to attend this informative event. Everyone is cordially invited to attend.

3 May — “Stories of Our LGBTQ Ancestors: Dr. Amber Starbuck and Mabel Stevens and the Big House”
The Sexual Minorities Archives
at The Arts Trust Building, 33 Hawley St., Northampton, 7 pm

The Sexual Minorities Archives of Holyoke will present a new history talk about Dr. Amber Starbuck and Mabel Stevens of Middlefield. The two women were an out lesbian couple who ran a wellness resort called the Big House in Middlefield from the 1920s to the 1960s. The talk draws on a range of primary sources discovered and organized by the SMA.

Co-sponsored by Historic Northampton in partnership with the Northampton Center for the Arts. To reserve your seat, please register. Suggested donation: $10 adults; $5 students/elders.

1 May — “At Sword’s Point: A Labor History of Franklin County”
Belding Memorial Library, Ashfield, MA, 7 pm

Western Massachusetts’ remarkable industrial history is matched by an equally remarkable history of organized labor. This untold story, pieced together using archival research, is presented with period images. The United Electrical Workers union was a good fit for workers until it was targeted by the Red Scare – turning the region into ground zero for a national struggle that lives with us to this day.

Tom Goldscheider is a labor historian based in Florence, MA. He earned a Masters in History at UMass Amherst and has published his work and given talks on them.

For more information:
Tom Goldscheider
tom.goldscheider@gmail.com

APRIL 2019

30 April — “The Creation of Quabbin Reservoir”
Pelham Historical Society & Pelham Library
at the Ramsdell Rm., Community Library, Pelham, 7pm

Quabbin historian and author J. R. Greene will present a narrated slide program of scenes relating to the creation of the Quabbin Reservoir. The program concludes with views of life in the towns prior to the flooding, with a focus on the town of Pelham. Available for sale will be a collection of J. R. Greene’s books. For more information contact:

Linda Campbell Hanscom, 413-323-7377.

28 April — “The Goshen Town Hall: Myth and Fact”
Goshen Historical Society
Goshen Town Hall, 42 Main St. Goshen, 2 pm

Norene Roberts will explain how the current 1911 Town Hall replaced the first one, who was involved, how money was raised, who was hired to design and oversee construction, some of the design features, and information uncovered in the 2016 historic rehabilitation.

Refreshments served, all ages welcome! Free and open to the public.

Brought to you by:
The Goshen Historical Society
GoshenHistoricalSociety@gmail.com
(413) 268-7120

28 April — “Growing Our Clothes: Local Lambs in Linen”
Shelburne Historical Society, 33 Severence St., Shelburne, 1-4 pm

Join us this spring to kick off our first in a series of “Grow Your Own” in Shelburne with “Growing Our Clothes: Local Lambs in Linen.” This interactive program is free and open to the public. Interact with local farmers and fiber artists inside and outside (weather
permitting) the Arms Academy Building, as well as meeting the fiber producing animals. Activities for the whole family will include making matchbox looms, embroidery, finger weaving and felted penny rug appliques. Come inside and see our loom, upstairs, as well as spinning demonstrations. Refreshments will served.

This event is supported in part by a grant from the Shelburne Cultural
Council.

Shelburne Historical Society
33 Severance Street
Shelburne Falls, MA 01370

27 & 28 April — “Amasa Holcomb: Renaissance Man of Southwick”
Southwick Historical Society & Southwick Cultural Council
at the Southwick Town Hall, 454 College Highway, Southwick, 10 am – 4 pm

Amasa Holcomb was a descendant in the 7th generation of Thomas Holcomb, one of the settlers of Ancient Windsor. Born in northern Connecticut, in what is now the “jog” section of Southwick, Mass., Amasa Holcomb was an outstanding individual in several areas. Self-taught, he excelled at astronomy, surveying, preaching, manufacturing, and teaching. He accurately predicted the 1806 eclipse and published an almanac in 1807 and 1808. The latter is among the collections of the Southwick Historical Society, Inc. We have many other items documenting the life of Amasa Holcomb: his autobiography, receipts for his work as surveyor and estate administrator, a record of the marriages he performed (from 1833 through 1874), his probate records, and two of his account books, both of which have been reproduced in hard copy and one as a TIFF. These primary sources describe in detail the many facets of his life. Several of his telescopes and his autobiography are among the collections of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC.

Funds for this exhibit have been provided by Mass Humanities and the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts through grants to the Pioneer Valley History Network.

27 April — “Federal Cabinetmaking: Kneeland & Adams of Hartford”
Historic Deerfield
Deerfield Community Center, Deerfield, 9 am – 4:30 pm

Historic Deerfield One-Day Decorative Arts Forum

In 2016, the ledger of Lemuel Adams, the shop principal of the Hartford, Connecticut, cabinetmaking firm Kneeland & Adams (1792-1795), was discovered. It featured the shop’s financial accounts, biographical information, customer lists, shop output, and other previously unknown information – leading to new scholarship on the firm and its larger network of cabinetmaking firms in southern New England. This forum will provide context for and a summary of the ongoing research of the firm.

Featuring lectures by:
Robert D. Mussey, Jr., Furniture Scholar and Retired Conservator, Robert Mussey Associates: “Kith, Kin, and Federal Cabinetmaking: Stephen Badlam”
Christine Ritok, Associate Curator, Historic Deerfield: “Federal Cabinetmaking of the Lower Connecticut River in Southern New England”
Kevin G. Ferrigno, Private Researcher: “Products of the Kneeland & Adams Cabinetmaking Shop”
Katherine Fecteau, Assistant Curator, Old Sturbridge Village: “Consumer Reports: Archival Evidence of Kneeland & Adams Clients”
Daniel S. Sousa, Assistant Curator, Historic Deerfield: “A Journeyman’s Journey: The Career of Jonathan Bright”

The cost of the program (which includes lunch) is $80 for Historic Deerfield members; $95 for the general public, and $115 for new members of Historic Deerfield. For more information and registration, contact Julie Orvis at jorvis@historic-deerfield.org or call (413) 775-7179. Register online using the button below.

27 April — Western New England Chapter, Spring 2019 Meeting
Association for Gravestone Studies
at the Greenfield Community College Downtown Campus, 270 Main St., Greenfield, 10 am – 3 pm

The program will include:

Claire Carlson, Education Program Coordinator at Historic Deerfield, will do a short classroom presentation on the Old Deerfield Burying Ground, showing some of the stones as they were in the 1960s when they were fully photo-documented, and then, after lunch, she will lead a walk around the burying ground, so we can see how the stones look today.

Peter Thomas (archaeologist) and Kevin Sweeney (historian) have offered to come and discuss their research on the monuments erected to commemorate the September 1675 Bloody Brook Fight in South Deerfield.

CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SPEAKERS — If you would like to do a presentation (20-30 mins.), during the morning session, contact Bob Drinkwater: soulestones@gmail.com or Andrea Carlin: anduruna@hotmail.com.

Coffee, snacks and a light lunch will be provided (we request a small donation to defray costs).  After lunch (weather permitting) we will visit the Old Deerfield Burying Ground (and perhaps, one or more other local cemeteries).

This event is free and open to the public. If you plan to attend the meeting, please RSVP to Andrea: anduruna@hotmail.com.

22 April — “A Mason’s Tool Chest”
Westhampton Public Library, Westhampton, 6 pm

with Dennis Picard

From foundations to fence posts; millstones to gravestones, the work of the Early American mason is still evident around us to this day. Come see examples of his work and learn about the tools and techniques that were used to create them.

16 February thru 21 April — Exhibit: “The Time of My Life: Vintage Views of Western Massachusetts”
Memorial Hall Museum
Great Falls Discovery Center, Turners Falls

“Having the time of my life.” So wrote Bernice on a postcard sent to her “Ma” in the early 20th century—one among many cards from Memorial Hall Museum’s collection, now in the Great Hall. Enlarged postcard scenes take visitors on an imaginary road trip, with stops at Mount Tom, Mount Holyoke Summit House, Sugarloaf, Turners Falls, Greenfield, Shelburne Falls and the Mohawk Trail. Sit down and relax with reproduction postal souvenir albums, a hands-on stereoscope, and a Viewmaster with other area scenes that paint pictures of civic pride and new ideas about leisure and travel. Before cell phones and social media, the picture postcard reigned supreme. Sponsored by Memorial Hall Museum. The Discovery Center is closed two Sundays this month: March 17 and 24.

18 April — Spring Break Youth Workshop
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot St., Holyoke, noon- 2 pm

On Thursday, April 18 from 12:00 – 2:00 p.m., Wistariahurst will host a Spring Break Youth Workshop. Youth are invited to an afternoon of vision boarding and storytelling!

All ages are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult. This event is free and open to all, but interested participants are encouraged to RSVP. Please indicate your interest by clicking ‘Going’ on the Spring Break Youth Workshop event on the Wistariahurst Facebook page or by calling 413-322-5660.

ABOUT WISTARIAHURST
Wistariahurst is an educational and cultural center owned and operated by the City of Holyoke and supported by Historic Holyoke at Wistariahurst. Wistariahurst is dedicated to preserving Holyoke’s history and inspiring an appreciation of history and culture through educational programs, exhibits and special events. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Wistariahurst is the former home of William Skinner, a prominent silk manufacturer and was built in 1874.

Today, Wistariahurst offers a wide variety of public programs and events including: workshops, concerts, lectures and demonstrations and serves the community through educational programs, community partnerships, history projects, and outreach activities. More information is available at www.Wistariahurst.org

18 April — “Hour in the Tower at Holyoke City Hall”
Friends of City Hall, Holyoke

Guided tours of the tower, 10 am – noon, Adults (17+) $30
Guided tour with clock restorer, David Cotton, 1-3 pm, Adults (17+) $100

CALL 413-200-9848 for more information.

Tickets available at http://www.eventbrite.com

Signed liability release is required prior to ascent of tower. Tower is NOT ADA accessible.

All proceeds go to support the efforts to restore and maintain Holyoke’s historic city hall.

14 April — “The Secret World of Deltiology”
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
at the Great Falls Discovery Center, Turners Falls, MA

The field of deltiology has a loyal following-but what is it? The term – the study and collecting of picture postcards – was coined in 1945. Learn local deltiologists’ secrets. Why do they collect? What are they looking for? Where do they find the postcards they collect? After the program, help keep the art of postcard writing alive by sending a message to someone special on a complimentary stamped postcard and maybe catch the deltiological bug yourself! Presented by Reba-Jean Shaw-Pichette, Shelburne Historical Society, and Sheila Damkoehler, Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, in
conjunction with the “Time of My Life” postcard exhibit in the Great Hall.

13 April — Patriots Day Revolutionary Muster
Historic Deerfield, Deerfield, 10 am – 4 pm

Celebrate Patriot’s Day at Historic Deerfield! Travel back in time and rediscover the history behind the Patriot’s Day holiday and the “shot heard round the world.” Revolutionary times will come to life through lively re-enactments including cannon-firing and musket drills, demonstrations of period crafts and activities, fife and drum music, and a muster. Included with general admission.

Cap off the day with a special dinner at Champney’s Restaurant and Tavern at the Deerfield Inn with a historic themed dinner:

A GOURMET GLANCE AT THE PAST
Please join us for an evening of food and food history!

We will take you through a five course meal based on dishes of the past with a bit of information about how these dishes would have been prepared or served years ago.  We have updated the recipes to make them a bit more current and approachable.  This should be an interesting, educational and tasty evening!

Doors and cash bar available from 5 p.m. with a classic snack to appease your palate!  Dinner to begin at 5:30 p.m.  Purchase tickets to “A Gourmet Glance at the Past” online.

12 April — “Jewish Community of Amherst:  The Founding Years”
History Bites Lunchtime Lecture Series
Simeon Strong House, 67 Amity Street, Amherst, 12:15 pm

“No place, no rabbi, no prayer books, no Torah, no Ark. The stakes were high.”  Join us as author and JCA founding member Irving Seidman speaks about his new book “The Jewish Community of Amherst: The Formative Years, 1969-1979.” This is the story of how a widely diverse group of Jews new to Amherst wished to connect to each other for the sake of their children’s Jewish identities and their own. How word-of-mouth connections led them to establish two different Jewish committees that coalesced to form the Jewish Community of Amherst. How the accomplishments of the founders and early members of the JCA established principles, structures and ways of being together that continue to influence the JCA.

Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at amhersthistory.org.

3 March thru 13 April — Exhibit: “Made in Westfield”
Westfield Athenaeum, 6 Elm Street, Westfield

“Made in Westfield” is a look at manufacturing and industry in Westfield – presents 45 companies and their products spanning the 19th through 21st centuries. From the early industries of brick & ice making powder mills and furniture building to the more unique manufacturing of hoop skirts, washer tubs, extracts & flavors, stoves, marble, bicycles, whips, paper, golf clubs, piano legs and pipe organs – Westfield made them all. The exhibit, which runs through April 13th, also showcases some of Westfield’s long-standing
manufacturers & their products (Westfield Grinding Wheel, Micro Abrasive, Advance Manufacturing, ITI, H. B. Smith, Mestek, Stanley Home Products) as well as businesses of the past (Digital, Foster Machine, Stevens Paper, Robinson Reminders, Old Colony Envelope, Colonial Art, Knight Club Soda). A reception will be held on March 26th at 6:30 p.m. highlighting some of Westfield’s current manufacturers: Micro Abrasive, Westfield Grinding Wheel, International Technology, H. B. Smith, Westfield G&E, Mestek, Jarvis
Surgical Inc., Savage Arms and Angy’s Landolfi Group. The public is cordially invited to the reception and to view the exhibit during regular library hours:

Monday – Thursday, 8:30 am – 8 pm
Friday & Saturday, 8:30 am – 5 pm

3-6 April — New England Regional Genealogy Conference
DoubleTree by Hilton
Manchester, NH

“Family: a Link to the Past & a Bridge to the Future”
Visit: http://www.NERGC.org

2 April — “Noteworthy Women of West Springfield 1635 – 1935”
Ramapogue Historical Society
at the Community Rm., West Springfield Public Library, 6:30 — 8:30 pm.

On Tuesday, April 2, 2019 the Ramapogue Historical Society will be sponsoring a program entitled “Noteworthy Women of West Springfield 1635 – 1935” at the West Springfield Public Library Community Room from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm.

The discussion will be led by local historian and educator, Stanley Svec and will feature several other members of the Ramapogue Historical Society, each highlighting West Springfield women who have made a difference. Beginning with Frances Sanford Pynchon, wife of the founder of the Springfield settlement, the presentation will follow a chronological approach providing participants with a Women’s History of West Springfield from inception of the English in the Valley through suffrage and the Great Depression. The first of a two-part program series celebrating the Centennial of the 19th Amendment (Women’s Suffrage), this event will be followed by another program in the fall highlighting West Side women who made a difference in more recent history.

Stanley Svec is a Living Historian, Lecturer and Teacher at West Springfield High School. He has given dozens of lectures around the area on topics ranging from King Philip’s War through World War One. He is often seen around the area with his fiddle performing and discussing historic music with his Camp Group, The NE’ER DO WELLS or leading excursions to lost historic sites like the Bear Hole Resort.

The lectures are free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. The West Springfield Public Library is located at 200 Park Street, West Springfield, MA 01089.

MARCH 2019

8 March thru 31 March — “Signs of the Times – An Exhibit”
Historic Northampton
at the Mezzanine, 33 Hawley St., Arts Trust Building, Northampton

Sculpture by Harriet Diamond including The Northampton Vigil to Lift the Sanctions Against Iraq and a new near life-size sculpture of Frances Crowe will be on exhibit along with signs from the 100 Signs for 100 Years March. At right is a section of the Iraq Vigil sculpture featuring Frances talking with two soldiers. The other figures are tiny portraits of other folks who gathered in Northampton on Saturdays to oppose the Iraq War. Image courtesy of Harriet Diamond (www.sculpturestories.com).

24 March — “Through an Indian’s Looking Glass: William Apess, Pequot”
Historic Deerfield Winter Lecture Series
at Garonzik Auditorium, Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, 2 pm

Presented by Drew Lopenzina, Old Dominion University.

This winter’s free lecture series is devoted to re-centering indigenous peoples’ experience and perspectives within broader American narratives and histories. Each presenter will share new scholarship and insights that bring to light Native men and women as active participants and autonomous history makers. Join us as we consider George Washington through the lens of great Native leaders, William Apess as a voice of and for indigenous survival and identity in the nineteenth century, and how “reverse fieldwork” can be deployed to reveal new insights into the relations between collectors and informants during the era of salvage anthropology.

23 March — “Lost Springfield”
Springfield Armory National Historic Site
One Armory Square, Springfield, 2 pm

Join local author and historian Derek Strahan for his presentation,  “Lost Springfield,” on Saturday, March 23 at 2:00 pm. Presentation will take place in the museum theater. Seating is limited, please call the museum to make reservations. Admission is free.

With the opening of the the first federal Armory, Springfield experienced rapid growth. With that golden age of progress came iconic buildings and landmarks that are now lost to time. Railroads brought workers eager to fill Springfield’s factories and enterprises like Springfield Armory, Smith & Wesson, Merrian Webster and Indian Motorcycles.

“There’s something intriguing about old photographs. I don’t know why, but I’ve always been drawn to them. Even in elementary school, the one book that I probably checked out of the library more than any other was a book on our town’s history”, commented author Derek Strahan.

During the presentation, Derek will take a look at commerce and industry from 19th century Springfield, focusing on the lost buildings that once housed these businesses, along with many innovations and important events that occurred there. About half of the subjects are from his book, Lost Springfield, while the other half is new material that has not been previously published or presented.

Derek Strahan is a Springfield resident and the author of the blog, “Lost New England” and the book,  Lost Springfield.  He is a graduate of  Westfield State University with degrees in English and Regional Planning, and teaches English at the Master’s School in Simsbury, Connecticut. Derek also serves as president of the Springfield Preservation Trust.

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of our Nation’s first armory, established in 1794. Managed with the Commonwealth of MA, Springfield Technical Community College and the National Park Service, it is the home of the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. The site is open Wednesday – Sunday, 9 AM- 5 PM. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check http://www.nps.gov/spar.

23 & 30 March — “The Mysteries of DNA Explained”
Community Rm., Holyoke Public Library, 250 Chestnut St., Holyoke, 10 am – noon

with Dave Robison

DNA testing for family history research has conquered many brick walls, but is it for you?  Perhaps you are still deciding whether to not to test, or maybe you already have your results.  In either case, Dave Robison’s two presentations will answer many of your questions and help you make informed decisions about next steps regarding DNA testing.

Together, the two Saturday morning sessions will cover these topics:

  • What types of DNA can be extracted?
  • What is the function of each type?
  • How are the tests conducted?
  • What can I do with the information?
  • What are the limitations of DNA testing?
  • I’ve got my test results, now what?
  • To share or not to share?

The March 23 session will focus on introductory topics, while March 30 will cover more complex questions.

Dave Robison, Old Bones Genealogy of New England , has more than twenty years of experience with genealogical research and has helped hundreds of people with his workshops, courses, and consultations.  He is the President of the Western Massachusetts Genealogical Society  and is active in many other genealogical associations.

Please call to pre-register for one or both sessions: (413) 420-8107.
There is no cost to attend.
This event was rescheduled from an earlier date.

21 March — “Amy Goodman on What One Person Can Do”
Historic Northampton
at John M. Greene Hall, Smith College, 7 pm

Award-winning independent journalist and host of the daily news program Democracy Now! Amy Goodman will give a talk in honor of Frances Crowe on her 100th birthday.

Sponsored by Smith College’s Special Collections, Sophia Smith Archives of Women’s History, which holds Frances’ papers.

20 March — “Clickbait, Hashtags, and Viral Rage: Writing Politics on Social Media – and How We Can Do Better”
UMass Amherst History Department
Bernie Dallas Room, Goodell Hall, UMass Amherst, 4 pm

with Claire Bond Potter, Professor of History, New School

Since the 2016 election cycle, we have all become aware that social media, and the wide variety of clickbait information that circulates there, have become powerful forces in national politics. This talk will focus on several recent examples of social media events triggered by clickbait, most prominently the recent confrontation between a Native American activist and students from Covington Catholic High School on January 18 2019. Social media events triggered by clickbait are particularly difficult to engage online, or to write about thoughtfully afterwards: the original image, post or video is effective, not because it is true or false, but because it taps into strong feelings, either about core values or values we aspire to. Social media offers us a paradoxical solution to the anger and pain that it triggers: to return to its platforms and write more, an action that, much of the time, triggers more anger than pain. But what would happen if we thought of writing, not as incidental to our presence on social media, but its core activity? What values can a writing practice bring to social media — and how might it help us navigate its perilous political world?

Claire Bond Potter is Professor of History at The New School for Social Research, New York, NY, and Executive Editor of Public Seminar. She is co-editor, with Renee Romano, of Historians on Hamilton: How a Blockbuster Musical Restaged American History (Rutgers University Press: 2018) Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012). Her writing has appeared in general audience publications such Dissent, The Washington Post, Jacobin, and the New York Times. Potter received her B.A. from Yale University and her Ph.D. from New York University. Currently, she is writing a biography of political media titled Click Bait Nation: the Origins of American iPolitics.

Location Information:  Goodell Hall is located in the central part of campus, approximately one city block from the UMass Parking Garage (1 Campus Center Way, $1.75/hr). More information: bus schedule, campus map with Goodell Hall and nearby parking indicated.

Accessibility  Goodell Hall is wheelchair accessible. To request additional accommodations, email communications@history.umass.edu. More information: accessible parking, campus accessibility map.

16 March — “New England Travels”
Deerfield- Wellesley Symposium
Deerfield Community Center, Historic Deerfield, 9 am – 5 pm

Sponsored by Historic Deerfield and the Grace Slack McNeil Program for Studies in American Art at Wellesley College. This event is Free.

This day-long symposium will explore the art and material culture of New England travel from 1700-1950. As early as the 18th century, Americans and foreign observers alike remarked upon the restlessness of a population on the move despite the hardships, expense, and logistical challenges of long-distance travel. After the Revolution, a growing network of roads, canals, railroads, and steamships connected Americans to destinations both near and far. Whether journeying for business, pleasure, health reasons, or to visit kin, many travelers recorded their impressions in works of art as well as writing. Nineteenth-century New Englanders seemed especially prone to journey far from their homes as they succumbed to what one observer described as “Yankee roam-all-over-the-world-itiveness.”

16 March — History Camp Boston 2019
Suffolk University Law School, Boston, 9 am

History Camp Boston 2019 will take place on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Suffolk University Law School, across from the Old Granary Burying Ground in downtown Boston.  There will also be events Saturday evening, including a special performance and an after party, and on Sunday. This event is Sold Out!

16 March — “Celebrate the Struggle: 100 Signs for 100 Years”
Historic Northampton
at the Northampton Center for the Arts, 33 Hawley St., 1 pm

Well-known activist Frances Crowe is turning 100 on March 15th. To celebrate her birthday, participants are invited to make a sign about an issue that concerns them or one that particularly concerns Frances. March with your sign from 33 Hawley Street up Main Street to City Hall led by the Expandable Brass Band. Then march back again for an indoor celebration at 33 Hawley Street.

15 March — “A History of the Amherst Police”
History Bites Lecture Series
Amherst Historical Society, Simeon Strong House, 67 Amity St., Amherst, 12:15 pm

with Ron Young

In 1872, Fiske A. Thayer became Amherst’s first nightwatchman and lighter of street lamps.  He was paid  $2 per night to patrol the streets from 9 pm to 6 am, 351 nights of the year. Thayer was also required to light the street lamps, care for them and put them out. In 1874, he became the first keeper of the lock up, built to the rear of the fire engine  house (now the site of the High Horse on North Pleasant).

Captain Ron Young of the Amherst Police will present the origins of the Amherst police service and the early days of policing in Amherst. He brings his abiding interest in Amherst Police history and firsthand knowledge of what it means to serve. Young joined the department as a community service officer in 1987 and currently serves as the department’s captain in charge of administration.

Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at amhersthistory.org.

13 March — “One Room Schoolhouses in Westfield”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Westfield Athenaeum, 6:30 pm

Presented by Walter Fogg

13, 20 & 27 March — Museum Course: “Chinese Export Porcelain and its Global Impact”
Flynt Center of Early New England Life, Historic Deerfield, 7 – 9 pm

The Chinese perfected the skills for making porcelain during the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907). A fired combination of kaolin (china clay) and petuntse (china stone), Chinese porcelain was white, durable, and translucent. Most porcelain in China came from kilns at Jingdezhen, a city in northeastern Jiangxi Province. Introduced to Europe in the 14th century, Chinese porcelains were regarded as objects of great rarity and luxury. By the early 16th century when Portugal had developed trade routes to the East, Chinese potters began to produce objects specifically for export to the West. These imports proved a great success. Early expressions of “Chinamania” inspired a trend of using porcelain as a form of interior design. In palaces and homes of the aristocracy and the rising merchant class (made wealthy by trade), rooms lined with displays of porcelain from floor to ceiling became opulent, delightful showplaces. The porcelain room culminated in the porcelain palace with an installation conceived by Augustus the Strong (1670–1733), Elector of Saxony and King of Poland. Called the Japanese Palace, the building was designed to hold his prized collection of more than 26,000 Chinese and Japanese porcelains.

As the export trade increased, so did the demand from Europe for familiar, utilitarian forms. Mugs, tureens, and candlesticks (forms unknown in China) were sent as models to the Chinese potteries for duplication. Chinese enamelers, renowned for their superb copying skills, also recreated decoration brought to them in the form of prints, bookplates, and drawings.  Special orders for personalized porcelains, such as those decorated with coats of arms, went through Chinese intermediaries and often took as long as two years to receive. With the appearance of porcelain factories in Europe in the early 18th century, the demand for Chinese export porcelain began to decline, and by the second half of the century, the trade experienced a serious downturn. Then new markets, such as the United States, revitalized the export porcelain industry in the late 18th century. In addition to bringing home stock patterns decorated in underglaze blue, American merchants in China expedited special orders for private clients back home. By the time Americans arrived in Canton in 1784, an extensive system of decorating workshops operated in the city, fulfilling orders for personalized wares.

Join us for this three-session course that takes an in-depth look at Chinese porcelain exported to the West. Each insightful class will be divided into a lecture and a study session. Participants will have the rare opportunity to see objects from the museum’s collection up close.

Course Instructor Amanda Lange is Curatorial Department Director and Curator of Historic Interiors at Historic Deerfield. She has a master’s degree in Early American Culture from the Winterthur Program at the University of Delaware. Since 1994, she has overseen the ceramics, glass, and metals collections at the museum. She organized the exhibition, “The Canton Connection: Art and Commerce of the China Trade, 1784–1860” and wrote its accompanying catalogue, Chinese Export Art at Historic Deerfield (2005).

The cost for the course is $100 ($90 for members, $125 for new members*). Fee includes all three courses; courses are not sold individually.

* This registration gives you a new Individual Membership in Friends of Historic Deerfield (a $50 value) that entitles you to free admission to Historic Deerfield, 10% discount at the Deerfield Inn and Museum Store, Historic Deerfield Magazine, the members’ newsletter published twice a year, and invitations to members’ exhibition openings, lectures, and special trips. Special membership offer is not valid for renewals of current or lapsed memberships.

For more information, contact Julie Orvis at jorvis@historic-deerfield.org or (413) 775-7179. Cancellation Policy: A full refund of the registration fee can be obtained if you cancel before 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 6.

12 March — “Fence Viewers: Past and Present”
Pelham Historical Society & Pelham Library
Ramsdell Rm., Pelham Library, 7:30 pm

Fence Viewers: Past and Present

Did you know that Pelham has an official Fence Viewers? Joseph Larson, one of Pelham’s current Fence Viewers, will explain how this ancient and honorable town position was created in Colonial days. Learn how he became involved, publishing the Handbook on Fence Viewers in Massachusetts, and what Fence Viewers actually do in Pelham today. Business Meeting at 7 p.m., followed by Presentation at 7:30 p.m.

For more information contact Cynthia Weigel, 413-256-4606.

6 March — History of Westfield Normal School
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Arno Maris Gallery, Ely Hall, Westfield State University, 6:30 pm

Presented by Dr. Beth Ann Rothermel, Dr. Mara Dodge, and Walter Fogg

1 March — “Indigenous Amherst: The life and work of Charles “Ohiyesa” Eastman and his family”
History Bites Lunchtime Lecture Series
at the Woodbury Room, Jones Library, Amherst, 12:15 pm

Charles Eastman was a Native American (Santee Dakota) author and activist, and resident of Amherst from 1911-19.  Kiara Vigil, Assistant Professor of American Studies at Amherst College, will highlight Charles Eastman’s life, his position as a “public face for the Indian people” and how he successfully navigated circuits of power using academia, the literary marketplace, and the federal government’s Indian Service. Eastman’s story gives us a glimpse into the life of Indigenous members of the Amherst community in the early 20th century, a critical period in which Indigenous people gained cultural and political influence in the United States.

She will draw on research from her first book Indigenous Intellectuals: Sovereignty, Citizenship, and the American Imagination, 1880-1930, (Cambridge University Press) in which she posits that Charles Eastman and his contemporaries were integral to the shaping of debates around citizenship and race within American society during the early twentieth century, and identifies his cohort as part of a wider network of Indian people whose work as writers, activists, and performers demand a re-imagining of American history.

We have moved this talk to the Woodbury Room at the Jones Library due to the high level of interest expressed.

Join us with your lunch in hand. We will provide coffee, tea and cider for you as you listen to the presentations. The 30-minute program begins promptly at 12:15 with seating and beverages ready just before noon. The lectures are free and everyone is welcome to attend. For updated information, check our website at: amhersthistory.org.

FEBRUARY 2019

28 February — “Genealogy and the United States Census”
Westhampton Public Library, Westhampton, 6:30 pm

Stop by to learn about the US census and how it can be used in genealogical research.

27 February — “Where Two Worlds Meet: Native Americans of Western Mass.”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Loughman Rm, Scanlon Hall, Westfield State University, 6:30 pm

Presented by Gail White

24 February — “Fictive Kin: Frank Speck, Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Other Native Informants”
Historic Deerfield Winter Lecture Series
at Garonzik Auditorium, Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, 2 pm

Presented by Margaret Bruchac, University of Pennsylvania.

This winter’s free lecture series is devoted to re-centering indigenous peoples’ experience and perspectives within broader American narratives and histories. Each presenter will share new scholarship and insights that bring to light Native men and women as active participants and autonomous history makers. Join us as we consider George Washington through the lens of great Native leaders, William Apess as a voice of and for indigenous survival and identity in the nineteenth century, and how “reverse fieldwork” can be deployed to reveal new insights into the relations between collectors and informants during the era of salvage anthropology.

23 February & 2 March — “Mysteries of DNA Explained”
Holyoke Public Library, 250 Chestnut St., Holyoke, 10 am – noon

Two-part workshop with Dave Robison in the Holyoke Public Library Community Room.  Call to pre-register.

23 February — The Wartime Sisters Book Discussion
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Springfield, 11 am

Looking for some winter reading? Join Ranger Susan for Springfield Armory’s first book discussion, “The Wartime Sisters” by Lynda Cohen Loigman. This is a 2-part program that will take place on Saturday, February 9 and February 23 at 11 am. Seating is limited, please call the Armory to reserve a spot.

This historic novel is about two estranged sisters, raised in Brooklyn and each burdened with their own shocking secret, are reunited at the Springfield Armory where they both find employment in the early days of World War II.  Not only will the book be discussed, participants will delve more into the history of the Armory during WWII and archival photographs will be shown to tie in with the novel.

“I’ve always wanted to start a history book club at the Armory but never could decide on the first book, commented Ranger Ashman. Author Lynda Cohen Loigman visited the Armory last year and discussed her idea about a novel that would take place at the Armory during WWII and you could say, the rest is history!”

Autor Lynda Cohen Loigman grew up in Longmeadow , MA. Her debut novel, The Two-Family House, was a nominee for the Goodreads 2016 Choice Awards in Historical Fiction. Participants will have the opportunity to meet the author and have their book signed at the Jewish Community Center in Springfield on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 pm

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of our Nation’s first armory, established in 1794. Managed with the Commonwealth of MA, Springfield Technical Community College and the National Park Service, it is the home of the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. The site is open Wednesday – Sunday, 9 AM- 5 PM. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check www.nps.gov/spar.

Susan Ashman
Park Ranger & Historic Weapons Supervisor
Springfield Armory National Historic Site
One Armory Square, Suite 2
Springfield, MA 01105-1299
Ph: (413) 734-8551 ext 233
Fax: (413) 747-8062
Susan_Ashman@nps.gov

22 February — “Four Fridays in February”
Hatfield Historical Society,
2nd fl, Hatfield Public Library, 
39 Main St., Hatfield, 6-8 pm

GOT STUFF?

Whether you’re trying to organize your own photos, deal with your parents’ memorabilia and records, or experience the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, you will hopefully learn something you can use this Friday at the Hatfield Historical Museum.

Stop by Friday evening 6-8 pm for our “Four Fridays in February” drop-in clinic with the curator, and get some tips on preserving your family’s history and/or stories.

Come with questions (like how to remove the mildew smell in a treasured book) or bring an item to ask about. Or just come to check out the newest exhibits (like Out of the Darkness – A History of Illumination in Hatfield).

22 February — “Sleuthing & Serendipity: The “Discovered” Adventure of Two Intrepid Women Naturalists Who Helped Inspire Congress To Preserve The White Mountains”
Historic Northampton & The Berkshire Appalachian Mountain Club
at The Arts Trust Building, 33 Hawley St., Northampton, 7 pm

Valley authors Allison Bell & Maida Goodwin will share an unbelievable story featuring secret code, historical letters, separated photographs, a week-long hike in the White Mountains in 1902, women naturalists, the conservation crusade to protect the White Mountains, and the special ecology of these high elevation mountaintops.

Limited seating.
First come, first served.
Register to reserve a seat.

$8 members/donors of Historic Northampton, AMC and students
$12 all others

15 February — “Four Fridays in February”
Hatfield Historical Society,
2nd fl, Hatfield Public Library, 
39 Main St., Hatfield, 6-8 pm

GOT STUFF?

Whether you’re trying to organize your own photos, deal with your parents’ memorabilia and records, or experience the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, you will hopefully learn something you can use this Friday at the Hatfield Historical Museum.

Stop by Friday evening 6-8 pm for our “Four Fridays in February” drop-in clinic with the curator, and get some tips on preserving your family’s history and/or stories.

Come with questions (like how to remove the mildew smell in a treasured book) or bring an item to ask about. Or just come to check out the newest exhibits (like Out of the Darkness – A History of Illumination in Hatfield).

13 February — “Watershed Wanderings Through Time and Space”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Ely Library (2nd floor), Westfield State University, 6:30 pm

Presented by: Dr. Aaron Reyes, Dr. Brian Conz, Bill Rose, Mark Damon

Westfield River Watershed Association, 65 Years of Service

12 February — “The Cooking Gene: Tracing My African American Story Through Food”
CHC Events Hall, UMass Amherst, 5 pm

Presented by Michael W. Twitty, Culinary Historian and Chef

Reception to follow, featuring Michael Twitty’s recipes prepared by nationally renowned UMass Amherst Dining Services.

11-14 February — “Chocolate Detectives: An Historic Deerfield Learning Adventure”
Historic Deerfield, Deerfield

Put on your detective hat and delve into the fascinating history of chocolate in early America through a series of demonstrations, lectures, tours, and tastings. You will learn how chocolate got its start as a breakfast beverage and how technology and invention helped to transform it into candy bars and desserts. Discover how we have come to associate chocolate with Valentine’s Day and learn about the origins of the Toll House Cookie. See special equipment such as chocolate pots and cups from the 18th and 19th centuries, used by elite society to drink hot chocolate. You’ll even get the opportunity to participate in a Victorian valentine workshop and enjoy a chocolate themed dinner!

Featuring the following partners:

  • Bob Heiss of Tea Trekkers, who will present The Connoisseurship of Chocolate
  • Dede Wilson, chef and cookbook author, who will discuss The Original Tollhouse Cookie
  • Wistariahurst Museum, Holyoke, MA, a Victorian Valentine Workshop
  • Educator Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis of The Old North Church, Boston, who will talk about Boston’s Captain Jackson’s Chocolate Shop
  • The Lyman Plant House at Smith College: a visit to view the Cacao Tree in the Jungle Room

For more info, click here.

10 February — Founders’ Day Celebration
Amherst Historical Society & Jones Library
at the Simeon Strong House & the library’s Woodbury Rm., 2 pm

Please join us as we commemorate the February 13, 1759 founding of Amherst on Sunday, February 10 at 2:00 P.M. in the Jones Library Woodbury Room. Events include our Annual Meeting, the Conch Shell Award given this year to Julie Dobrow, and the Mabel Loomis Todd Lecture presented by Rob Cox. A reception with the drawing for the Upcycled Ski Adirondack Chair will follow next door at the museum’s Simeon Strong House. This event is free and open to the public.

The brief Annual Meeting of the Amherst Historical Society includes a report on our programs and financial status and the election of trustees. The Conch Shell Award was established in 2007 to honor those who have made a significant contribution to the culture and/or history of Amherst. This year we are honoring Julie Dobrow for After Emily: Two Remarkable Women and the Legacy of America’s Greatest Poet. It has been our pleasure to see her in-depth research into the lives of Mabel Loomis Todd and Millicent Todd Bingham grow into this book longlisted for both the Plutarch Award (Biographers International Organization honoring the best biography published in 2018) and the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography. Julie has been generous with her research and insights and has assisted the Amherst History Museum with exhibitions, lectures and tours on themes related to Mabel Loomis Todd. She has opened our eyes to a better understanding of Mabel Loomis Todd’s significant role in the life of Amherst and how Emily Dickinson became known to the wider world. You can more about Julie here.
The Conch Shell Award presentation will be followed by the Mabel Loomis Todd LectureThinking Colonial: Early Colonial Life in the Pioneer Valley presented by Rob Cox, based on stories extracted from the Hampshire Council record books for the late 17th century. Not the dull life we imagine! Cox is the head of Special Collections and University Archives at UMass Amherst. A graduate of Haverford College, he split his time between paleontology and molecular biology before receiving a MILS at the University of Michigan (with a concentration in archives) and a PhD in early American history. Before coming to UMass, he held positions as head of manuscripts at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan and as keeper of manuscripts at the American Philosophical Society.
Our Annual Meeting and Founder’s Day celebration is a great way to honor citizen achievements both past and present. Those who receive the Conch Shell award truly live up to the Amherst Historical Society’s mission to connect people to the town of Amherst, its history, and its culture. A reception will follow at the Simeon Strong House for continued conversation with our trustees, award winner and lecturer. We will also hold the drawing for the Upcycled Ski Adirondack Chair (You can still purchase tickets here.) Join us! We look forward to seeing you!

9 February — “Take a peek inside our local history and genealogy closet!”
Westhampton Public Library, Westhampton, 10 am – noon

Drop in anytime between 10 and noon and see what resources we have for genealogy and local history research. Lynn will be on hand to answer any questions. From family histories to histories of local roads, town reports (back to the late 1800’s!) and obituaries- we have a lot to look at!

9 February — The Wartime Sisters Book Discussion
Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Springfield, 11 am

Looking for some winter reading? Join Ranger Susan for Springfield Armory’s first book discussion, “The Wartime Sisters” by Lynda Cohen Loigman. This is a 2 part program that will take place on Saturday, February 9 and February 23 at 11 am. Seating is limited, please call the Armory to reserve a spot.

This historic novel is about two estranged sisters, raised in Brooklyn and each burdened with their own shocking secret, are reunited at the Springfield Armory where they both find employment in the early days of World War II.  Not only will the book be discussed, participants will delve more into the history of the Armory during WWII and archival photographs will be shown to tie in with the novel.

“I’ve always wanted to start a history book club at the Armory but never could decide on the first book, commented Ranger Ashman. Author Lynda Cohen Loigman visited the Armory last year and discussed her idea about a novel that would take place at the Armory during WWII and you could say, the rest is history!”

Autor Lynda Cohen Loigman grew up in Longmeadow , MA. Her debut novel, The Two-Family House, was a nominee for the Goodreads 2016 Choice Awards in Historical Fiction. Participants will have the opportunity to meet the author and have their book signed at the Jewish Community Center in Springfield on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 pm

Springfield Armory National Historic Site commemorates and preserves the site of our Nation’s first armory, established in 1794. Managed with the Commonwealth of MA, Springfield Technical Community College and the National Park Service, it is the home of the world’s largest historic American military firearms collection. The site is open Wednesday – Sunday, 9 AM- 5 PM. Admission is free. For information call 413-734-8551 or check www.nps.gov/spar.

Susan Ashman
Park Ranger & Historic Weapons Supervisor
Springfield Armory National Historic Site
One Armory Square, Suite 2
Springfield, MA 01105-1299
Ph: (413) 734-8551 ext 233
Fax: (413) 747-8062
Susan_Ashman@nps.gov

8 February — “Four Fridays in February”
Hatfield Historical Society,
2nd fl, Hatfield Public Library, 
39 Main St., Hatfield, 6-8 pm

GOT STUFF?

Whether you’re trying to organize your own photos, deal with your parents’ memorabilia and records, or experience the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, you will hopefully learn something you can use this Friday at the Hatfield Historical Museum.

Stop by Friday evening 6-8 pm for our “Four Fridays in February” drop-in clinic with the curator, and get some tips on preserving your family’s history and/or stories.

Come with questions (like how to remove the mildew smell in a treasured book) or bring an item to ask about. Or just come to check out the newest exhibits (like Out of the Darkness – A History of Illumination in Hatfield).

7 February — Arts & Humanities Spring Internship Fair
Arts Extension Service
Fine Arts Center, UMass Amherst, 11 am – 2:45 pm

Looking for a spring or summer Intern?! Save time by attending the Arts Extension Service Spring Arts & Humanities Internship Fair where you can connect with students in-person and leave with a short list of qualified, compatible candidates for your available internship position.

The Internship Fair will be held at the Fine Arts Center here at UMass Amherst, from 11:00 – 2:45 on Thursday, February 7th. Space is limited, so please let us know by December 21 if you are planning to attend and you will receive a follow-up email with further information.

To hear past attendees tell it:

“The Arts Extension Service Fall Arts & Humanities Internship Fair was a major success for the Paperbark team. We had many students stop by the table, about 10 signed up to stay in touch with Paperbark…We found our newest team member at the internship fair — he has filled the integral role of Outreach and Engagement Coordinator. The event was extremely well organized and we cannot wait to partner for the next one!”

– Erin Wnorowski, Managing Editor, Paperbark Literary Magazine

Not sure if an internship is right for your business? Internships are a great way to share what you know while simultaneously getting more professional support day to day. An Intern is with you to gain skills and exposure to what it truly means to work in the field. From marketing support to the nuts of bolts of business ownership, an Intern can take on tasks like database cultivation, social media marketing, event planning, and more. Reach out to us for more information about how an Internship can support your work.

We look forward to having you join us on February 7! RSVP to: aes@acad.umass.edu.

4 February — “Discovering New England Stone Walls”
Longmeadow Historical Society & Storrs Library
at Storrs Library, Longmeadow, 6:30 pm.

with Kevin Gardner

Longmeadow Historical Society and Storrs Library present Discovering New England Stone Walls with Kevin Gardner. Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time, and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin will occupy himself building a miniature wall on a tabletop using tiny stones.

2 February — “19th Century Ice Harvest”
Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation
at 42 Water St., off of Route 189, in Granville, noon – 3 pm

On February 2, 2019 the Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation (NCCHP) will re-create a small scale ice cutting on the pond at 42 Water Street, off of Route 189, in Granville, Massachusetts. The event is being co-sponsored by the Suffield Historical Society, the Suffield Land Conservancy and the Granville Cultural Council.

Dennis Picard, former director of Storrowtown Village Museum, will organize the harvest. Picard owns a complete collection of antique ice cutting tools. During his presentation he demonstrates the finer points of ice cut­ting and explains how to use the specialized tools. Visitors will also have an opportunity to join Mr. Picard on the ice to use an ice-saw or pike pole and learn first-hand about a harvest that provided an extra cash crop for local farmers.

The program will run between 12:00 PM and 3:00 PM. Visitors may participate anytime between those hours. A video on ice harvesting in New England will also be shown continuously in the NCCHP Museum. The museum will be open for tours that focus on the skills and art of drum making. We hope to bring people together to rekindle the community spirit of the farm communities and industrial villages that were common in most of New England. The Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation invites everyone with an interest in “living history” to join us at the museum.

Plan on visiting the ice harvesting demonstration on Saturday, February 2nd.  There is no charge for the event but donations will be gratefully accepted. For last minute information on ice conditions and status of the harvest visit the museum website ( www.ncchp.org ) or call 413-357-6321 on February 1, 2019.

2 February — “Tales of the Pedlar”
Holyoke History Room
Community Rm, Holyoke Public Library, 250 Chestnut St., Holyoke, 1 pm

An afternoon of stories and memories of Holyoke’s Yankee Pedlar Inn and Restaurant.

The famed Yankee Pedlar Inn and Restaurant was for decades an elegant local gathering spot and a destination for those in search of a fine dining experience.  Housed in the 1882 home of Judge John Hildreth and outfitted with remnants of Kenilworth Castle, it was one of the hubs of local social and political life.

On February 2, we have invited two former Pedlar employees to share their memories of the restaurant in the 1970s. A part of the afternoon will be devoted to audience sharing of their own recollections of this Holyoke institution in its heyday.
Sponsored by the Holyoke History Room.

JANUARY 2019

30 January — “The Solomon Brothers of Westfield in the Civil War and Beyond”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Westfield Athenaeum, Westfield, 6:30 pm

Presented by Ed Stannard

27 January — “The Indian World of George Washington”
Historic Deerfield Winter Lecture Series
at Garonzik Auditorium, Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, 2 pm

Presented by Colin Calloway, Dartmouth College.

This winter’s free lecture series is devoted to re-centering indigenous peoples’ experience and perspectives within broader American narratives and histories. Each presenter will share new scholarship and insights that bring to light Native men and women as active participants and autonomous history makers. Join us as we consider George Washington through the lens of great Native leaders, William Apess as a voice of and for indigenous survival and identity in the nineteenth century, and how “reverse fieldwork” can be deployed to reveal new insights into the relations between collectors and informants during the era of salvage anthropology.

24 January — “Getting Started On Your Family History Project”
Hubbard Memorial Library, 24 Center St., Ludlow, 6:30 pm

An informal presentation on the basics of genealogy, including strategies for getting started, techniques, and resources available. We’ll include a brief discussion of how genetics and DNA analysis have revolutionized the field. With more than 40 years of ge­nealogical research experience, Cliff McCarthy of the Genealogy and Local History Library, Springfield Museums, will share stories and lessons learned.”

16 January — “Northampton Parks: An Unexpected History”
Afternoon Tea & Talk
at the Look Park Garden House, Northampton, 1 – 4 pm

Join Historic Northampton and co-host Look Park for afternoon tea in the Garden House. Historic Northampton’s co-director Laurie Sanders will present an illustrated talk on Northampton’s parks, including Look Park, Childs Park and Pulaski Park as well as parks that were proposed and never created. See how Northampton parks fit within the context of the nationwide movement to establish parks across the United States.

Reservations Required. $10 for afternoon tea & talk. Call 413-584-5457 to make your reservation

16 January — “The Canal Greenway from History to Modern Rail Trail”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the Westfield Athenaeum, Westfield, 6:30 pm

Presented by Bob Madison

15 January — Drop-In Genealogy
Holyoke Public Library, 250 Chestnut St., Holyoke, 5 – 7:30 pm

Back by popular demand with a new day and time! Every Third Tuesday in the Computer Classroom throughout the Winter and Spring, we will have professional genealogist Hillary Schau on hand at these free drop-in sessions.  Hillary can help you organize your research, navigate the ever-expanding universe of online research, and discover new research avenues.  Already deep into your family history? Drop in to trade research tips and share success stories. Free! No pre-registration needed. Third Floor Computer Classroom.

15 January — Film Screening: “Community & Creativity: The Arts in Northampton”
Historic Northampton
at the Northampton Community Arts Trust Building, 33 Hawley St., Northampton, 7 pm

This special program will take a closer look at Northampton’s arts scene – from the 1970s on into the future. The event features the public premiere of “Vision of Thornes,” a 13-minute documentary about Gordon Thornes’ philosophy about the arts and his experience in Northampton.

Speakers will include Andrea Olsen, Stephen Petegorsky, Laurie Sanders and Elizabeth Sharpe.

Following the screening, audience members will be invited to share their thoughts about the role of creativity in shaping community and the relationship between business and the arts. Then, for those who are interested, Jeff Bliss and Richard Wagner will offer a behind-the-scenes tour of the new Northampton Community Arts Trust building.

Suggested donation: $5-10 at the door. Light refreshments. Limited seating. First come, first served or reserve your place by emailing info@historicnorthampton.org

14 January — “Crystal Products of the Frost King: Ice Harvesting and the Natural Ice Industry in New England”
Westhampton Public Library, Westhampton, 6:30 pm

The commercial harvesting of ice from New England’s ponds and lakes for export began in the first decade of the 19th century. By the end of that century ice harvesting was the 9th largest industry in the United States employing tens of thousands of workers in New England alone and producing hundreds of thousands of tons of block ice annually.

Dennis Picard has been demonstrating the ice harvesting trade for more than twenty years at museums and environmental education centers. He is also a frequent speaker on the ice industry for libraries, museums and universities. He will display some of his antique tools of that trade including several invented in Massachusetts. He will share the interesting tale of this once massive enterprise that is now fading from our collective memory. Picard also invites and guides would-be ice harvesters to try their hand at working with some of his antique implements, including a “pond saw” and the breaker bar.
Funded by the Friends of the Library and the Lyn Keating Programming Fund.

9 January — “Shays’ Rebellion”
Westfield 350th Historical Lecture Series
at the First Congregational Church, Westfield, 6:30 pm

Shays Rebellion is viewed as an agrarian revolt pitting impoverished farmers in western Massachusetts against the wealthy merchant class of the coastal eastern part of the State. Come hear an account of the participants and events of this post-revolutionary uprising that both confirm and negate this long held perception.

Dennis Picard will share the stories leading up to what was termed at the time, the “Regulators,” their activities in our area, a few personages of local interest – including Westfield’s own General Shepard, and the effect on our nation’s early history. Some demands of the 1780s such as the one calling for moving the State capital out of Boston have been rediscovered repeatedly and advocated for over the generations.

Dennis served as a consultant on the filming of the award winner “A Little Rebellion Now and Then: Prologue to the Constitution,” Calliope Films, 1985, which dramatizes the turbulent years after the American Revolution that culminated in Shays’ Rebellion and the framing of the Constitution